Consortium for Culture and Medicine (CCM)

CCM 405. Narratives of Illness, Disability, and Identity. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course we will read first-person narratives of illness and disability to explore the experiences of those who fall outside the boundaries of health and physical ability and what is often perceived as physical and/or mental "normalcy." We will discuss first-hand accounts of authors who, rather than remaining silent as the object of unthinking stares or insensitive medical care, have spoken out as subjects. We will consider the difficulties those with serious illness and disability encounter within their families, social groups, and health care settings and examine how these difficulties are at odds with health care practitioners' objectives and perspectives. We will examine what it means to look, move, and think differently in society and how that "difference" affects sympathy and attraction, the forces that knit individuals into a social fabric.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 505

CCM 407. Bioethics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the use of ethical theories and standards by health care professionals. Specific issues presented in the context of case studies illuminate different types of ethical dilemmas and alternative ways of handling them morally. Issues include euthanasia, assisted suicide, truth-telling, confidentiality, research ethics, abortion, genetic counseling, surrogate motherhood, the uses of new reproductive technologies, and justice with respect to care.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 507

CCM 408. Ethics and Health Professions. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the origins and use of ethical theories in the clinical, professional, organizational, and political-economic fields of action in health care. Specific issues presented in the context of case studies illuminate the several fields. These issues include assisted suicide, professional codes of ethics, the ethics of "cost-cutting," and justice with respect to care.

Cross-listed Courses: PHL 347, CCM 508

CCM 409. Culture and Mental Disorder. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar examines mental disorders from bio-medical and social constructionist perspectives; both cross-cultural variation and universals are explored in traditional cultures and modern nations, e.g., Africa, Mexico, Native Americans, Hutterits, Near East. First-person accounts are used to analyze the inner world of mental illness, and bio-cultural models of psychosis is proposed.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 509, PSY 309

CCM 410. Culture & Reproductive Health & Medicine. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines diverse ways in which societies throughout the globe view and manage human reporoduction and the implications this has for health care and medicine. The emphasis will be primarily, though not exclusively, on women's reproductive health throughout the life cycle, including puberty, sex, pregnancy, family planning, childbirth, infertility, and menopause. The course also explores changes in reproductive health care in the context of globalization and considers how an understanding of the influence of culture on reproductive health is crucial for the development of international public health policy and practice.

Cross-listed Courses: ANT 410, CCM 510

CCM 416. Medical Anthropology in Ecological Perspective. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the interaction of biological and cultural factors in disease causation, diagnosis, and treatment in Western and non-Western societies. The introduction of Western medicine to non-Western cultures is examined. After taking this course, students will be able to: describe the interaction of biological & cultural factors in the etiology, manifestation, and outcome of diseases cross-culturally; explain the psychosomatic basis of health & healing in historical, evolutionary, and ecological perspectives. Permission of the instructor required before registration. Fulfills Core requirement(s): DIV.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 516, ANT 416

CCM 420. Economic Issues in Health Care. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the challenging questions of why health care spending in the U.S. continues to rise in spite of efforts to control costs. The focus of the course will be on examining the key issues responsible for cost increases and why this country has one in six individuals without any health insurance and one in four with sub-standard health care. The topics include factors affecting demand and supply of health care services, such as sociocultural considerations and health care threats, demographic changes, in particular aging of the population; economic and legal forces impacting the health care system; and the role of technology in the delivery of health care.

Cross-listed Courses: ECO 320, CCM 520

CCM 422. Medicine in Literature and Film. 3 Credit Hours.

The relationship between literature and medicine will be explored through the study of novels, short stories, essays and films about medical situations, characters and themes. Thematic areas to be examined include medical ethics in literature; the hospital as environment; relationships between health care workers and patients; illness as metaphor and as reality. Discussion on what writers are communicating and how they do so will emphasize characterization, setting, tone and point of view.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 522, ENG 455

CCM 429. Dying and Death in American Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine American attitudes and responses toward the end of life through the perspective of American fiction, non-fiction, poetry and film. We will explore how Americans deal with progressive incurable disease, terminal illness, death and bereavement. Students will analyze readings as well as keep a journal documenting their responses toward the literature and class discussion.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 529

CCM 430. Global Health and Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course involves a careful examination of ethical issues in global and international health. The course focuses critical attention on ethical issues about trade in human organs, cultural practices that harm health, human migration, infectious diseases (like HIV and SARS), research conducted in low-income countries, drug pricing, health inequalities between countries, malnutrition, globalization, international civil society, and service abroad. To deal with these issues, the readings and lectures will develop ideas about respect, autonomy, community, need, responsibility, ethical relativism, human rights, and global justice.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 530

CCM 431. AIDS in American Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine attitudes (cultural, professional, medical, personal) towards those who have HIV/AIDS. The literature presented will reflect a combination of fictional and real characters through whose lives the progression of the disease will be followed from its initial incarnation as a mysterious, frightening curse to its current status as a chronic illness that can be managed with proper treatment and medication. Ethical dilemmas will be explored as AIDS is brought to the forefront of medicine, law, and politics and today's responses will be analyzed in comparison with those in the first days of the epidemic.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 531

CCM 432. Interdisciplinary Approaches Aging Issues. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will bring together students, faculty, and guests from multiple disciplines to explore interdisciplinary approaches to serving the needs of older adults. Each class will be devoted to a discrete topic ranging from end-of-life care, to driving cessation, to surrogate decision making, to elder abuse. Students will be offered readings from multiple disciplines relating to the topic of the week and one or two case studies to consider in advance of class. Class time will be devoted in large part to an interactive discussion of the case study or studies of the week. The aim of the course is for students to learn how other discipline might approach problems they encounter in their work with seniors, what other resources are available to assist them in their work with seniors, and how to work in a truly interdisciplinary manner with professionals from multiple disciplines.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 532

CCM 434. Representations of the Nurse in Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

How the nurse has been represented in literature, film and television is explored, focusing specifically at the relationships among images of nurses, ideologies of nursing, and the practice of nursing. Representations of nursing in late 19th century and 20th century texts are examined in relation to larger class and gender issues, including the ways in which the nurse threatened traditional notions of women. The social contexts of representations of nurses in late 20th century culture are analyzed, from Nurse Ratched in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest to the gay male nurse Belize in Angels in America, and stereotypes and iconoclastic figures are identified. Focusing on more recent literature, film and television, the figure of the nurse is considered in relation to contemporary concerns about the nursing profession such as the relationship between nurses and physicians, the economy of the hospital and health care, and the nursing shortage. Professional nurses guest lecture in the course.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 534

CCM 437. Exploring Good Leadership. 3 Credit Hours.

Two premises underline this course: (1)Because widesrpead deficiencies in leadership to address the complex and critical issues that threaten humankind, there is an urgent need for broadly educated, ethical leaders and (2) anyone who is an undergraduate, or professional student may be called to exert leadership now or in the future. This course will critically examine the skills and characteristics of good leaders, whether the leader operates on campus, in the local government, or in the world, and how they may be adapted to one's own style of leadership. Using short essays, reference materials, scenarios, interviews of leaders, and the student's own experiences, the topics explored will be, for example, What is Ethical Leadership?; Who Can Be a Leader?; How can Leadership Be created?; Integrity and Reputation; Use of Power; Education of Leaders; Motivation and Higher Principles; Knowing Oneself; Learning from Heroes, Mentors and Peers; Communicating Effectively; Listening with a Prepared Mind; Evolution and Ethical Behavior: and Leadership Style.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 537

CCM 439. Child Health Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Children's health is influenced by a host of factors, not least of which is policy. It may be influenced by policy directly at a medical level, or less directly at a child-serving systems level (eg. public health, education, juvenile justice). This course will cover how child health policy is developed, implemented, evaluated, and influenced, with a focus on how child health policy is influenced by circumstances beyond the traditional boundaries of "health care". Students will examine how law and medicine (specifically "child health") interact, hearing from a variety of disciplinary and community-based perspectives. Students will discuss how expertise from various sources might be joined to enhance the effectiveness of child health policy.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 539

CCM 440. Disability, Medicine and Representation. 3 Credit Hours.

This course aims to bring disability and medicine into cross-disciplinary dialogue by examining representations of disability and medicine in film, literature, and medical texts. These texts and conventions are considered in light of critical discussions of representation and disability. The "medicalization" of disability is examined, with students invited to explore disability and ability as cultural representations, wherein bodily abilities and limitations are conditioned by subjective perceptions of "normalcy". A principal question is how to incorporate a "social model" of disability into medical education and practice. Disability studies scholars and clinicians working on disability will be guest speakers.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 540

CCM 441. Global Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines global health from an anthropological perspective. It explores the political and social circumstances which shaped the development of international health. It examines how culture shapes both the conditions under which people experience morbidity and mortality and their responses to illness. Topics considered include the development of international health, epidemiological and anthropological research methods, gender and health, reproductive health, infectious disease, health and inequality, and the health consequences of war.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 541

CCM 442. Native American Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses Native American Public Health in four areas. First, the course covers the historical roots of health desparities among Native Americans. Second, students will review the epidemiology of disease, risk factors, and causes of death among Native Americans in Nations across the United States. Third, the course examines indigenous food ways and the contemporary diets of Native Americans to understand the barriers to healthy diets in contemporary Native American culture. Last, the course will cover substance abuse and addictions among Native Americans and consider Native American indigenous knowledge as an adjunct to chemical dependency treatment.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 542

CCM 443. Disability and Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore factors influencing the health and well-being of persons with disabilities, including models of disability, disability history, law and services, health disparities, health promotion, ethics, violence, and disaster preparedness. Students will be prepared to better understand one of the largest minority populations in the United States and that people with disability constitute a group that is relevant to every facet of diversity and culture. Given that the experiences of disability touches all aspects of society,this course will prepare students to take disability into account in work related to health and well-being.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 543

CCM 444. Native American Health and Wellness. 3 Credit Hours.

This course begins with an overview of the historical roots of health disparities among Native Americans. Students will then examine the experience of diseases, risk factors, and causes of death among Native Americans in Nations across the United States, including the role of substance abuse in contributing to health disparities. The last portion of the course considers the many aspects of Native American culture that contribute to wellness, including indigenous food ways, fitness, and Native American indigenous knowledge as an adjunct to chemical dependency treatment.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 544

CCM 445. Public Health Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines ethical issues in public health. Public health ethics is a new area of scholarship practice that addresses population-level health issues, such as issues of food stamps and health insurance, immunizations, public health research, legal and policy responses to infectious diseases and epidemics, and the role of religious and social values in setting health policy.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 545

CCM 446. Culture, Communication, and Ethics in Health Care. 3 Credit Hours.

Ethical, empathic, and effective health care involves good communication, reflection, and a social and cultural knowledge and skills. this course provides a model for collaborative and culturally sensitive and skilled communication in health care. Through the study of ethics cases, narratives, and literature, students will analyze disparities and discrimination in health care for people who are deaf and disabled. Students will explore solutions through deaf studies, disability studies, and narrative approaches to bioethics and health care. Guest speakers will include members of the Deaf community, disability studies scholars and advocates, sign language interpreters, and health care professionals.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 546

CCM 460. Law and Reproductive Rights. 3 Credit Hours.

The law touches on every aspect of our lives, including the most intimate and personal decisions we make concerning our reproduction, our sexuality, and our very identities. This course will focus on the ways in which lawmakers and judges have tried to create policy dealing with these extremely difficult issues, as well as what those outside of the courts and legislatures have argued about what the government's role should be in this area. Selected topics to be covered include abortion, the regulation of birth and motherhood, LGBT rights and policy, birth control and sex education.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 560

CCM 505. Narratives of Illness, Disability, and Identity. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course we will read first-person narratives of illness and disability to explore the experiences of those who fall outside the boundaries of health and physical ability and what is often perceived as physical and/or mental "normalcy." We will discuss first-hand accounts of authors who, rather than remaining silent as the object of unthinking stares or insensitive medical care, have spoken out as subjects. We will consider the difficulties those with serious illness and disability encounter within their families, social groups, and health care settings and examine how these difficulties are at odds with health care practitioners' objectives and perspectives. We will examine what it means to look, move, and think differently in society and how that "difference" affects sympathy and attraction, the forces that knit individuals into a social fabric.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 405

CCM 507. Bioethics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the use of ethical theories and standards by health care professionals. Specific issues presented in the context of case studies illuminate different types of ethical dilemmas and alternative ways of handling them morally. Issues include euthanasia, assisted suicide, truth-telling, confidentiality, research ethics, abortion, genetic counseling, surrogate motherhood, the uses of new reproductive technologies, and justice with respect to care.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 407

CCM 508. Ethics and Health Professions. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the origins and use of ethical theories in the clinical, professional, organizational, and political-economic fields of action in health care. Specific issues presented in the context of case studies illuminate the several fields. These issues include assisted suicide, professional codes of ethics, the ethics of "cost-cutting," and justice with respect to care.

Cross-listed Courses: PHL 347, CCM 408

CCM 509. Culture and Mental Disorder. 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar examines mental disorders from bio-medical and social constructionist perspectives; both cross-cultural variation and universals are explored in traditional cultures and modern nations, e.g., Africa, Mexico, Native Americans, Hutterits, Near East. First-person accounts are used to analyze the inner world of mental illness, and bio-cultural models of psychosis is proposed.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 409, PSY 309

CCM 510. Culture & Reproductive Health & Medicine. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines diverse ways in which societies throughout the globe view and manage human reporoduction and the implications this has for health care and medicine. The emphasis will be primarily, though not exclusively, on women's reproductive health throughout the life cycle, including puberty, sex, pregnancy, family planning, childbirth, infertility, and menopause. The course also explores changes in reproductive health care in the context of globalization and considers how an understanding of the influence of culture on reproductive health is crucial for the development of international public health policy and practice.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 410, ANT 410

CCM 516. Medical Anthropology in Ecological Perspective. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the interaction of biological and cultural factors in disease causation, diagnosis, and treatment in Western and non-Western societies. The introduction of Western medicine to non-Western cultures is examined. After taking this course, students will be able to: describe the interaction of biological & cultural factors in the etiology, manifestation, and outcome of diseases cross-culturally; explain the psychosomatic basis of health & healing; describe the methods and efficacy of non-Western healers and view illness and healing in historical, evolutionary, and ecological perspectives. Permission of instructor required before registration. Fulfills Core requirement(s): DIV.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 416, ANT 416

CCM 520. Economic Issues in Health Care. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the challenging questions of why health care spending in the U.S. continues to rise in spite of efforts to control costs. The focus of the course will be on examining the key issues responsible for cost increases and why this country has one in six individuals without any health insurance and one in four with sub-standard health care. The topics include factors affecting demand and supply of health care services, such as sociocultural considerations and health care threats, demographic changes, in particular aging of the population; economic and legal forces impacting the health care system; and the role of technology in the delivery of health care.

Cross-listed Courses: ECO 320, CCM 420

CCM 522. Medicine in Literature and Film. 3 Credit Hours.

The relationship between literature and medicine will be explored through the study of novels, short stories, essays and films about medical situations, characters and themes. Thematic areas to be examined include medical ethics in literature; the hospital as environment; relationships between health care workers and patients; illness as metaphor and as reality. Discussion on what writers are communicating and how they do so will emphasize characterization, setting, tone and point of view.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 422, ENG 455

CCM 529. Dying and Death in American Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine American attitudes and responses toward the end of life through the perspective of American fiction, non-fiction, poetry and film. We will explore how Americans deal with progressive incurable disease, terminal illness, death and bereavement. Students will analyze readings as well as keep a journal documenting their responses toward the literature and class discussion.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 429

CCM 530. Global Health and Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course involves a careful examination of ethical issues in global and international health. The course focuses critical attention on ethical issues about trade in human organs, cultural practices that harm health, human migration, infectious diseases (like HIV and SARS), research conducted in low-income countries, drug pricing, health inequalities between countries, malnutrition, globalization, international civil society, and service abroad. To deal with these issues, the readings and lectures will develop ideas about respect, autonomy, community, need, responsibility, ethical relativism, human rights, and global justice.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 430

CCM 531. AIDS in American Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine attitudes (cultural, professional, medical, personal) towards those who have HIV/AIDS. The literature presented will reflect a combination of fictional and real characters through whose lives the progression of the disease will be followed from its initial incarnation as a mysterious, frightening curse to its current status as a chronic illness that can be managed with proper treatment and medication. Ethical dilemmas will be explored as AIDS is brought to the forefront of medicine, law, and politics and today's responses will be analyzed in comparison with those in the first days of the epidemic.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 431

CCM 532. Interdisciplinary Approaches Aging Issues. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will bring together students, faculty, and guests from multiple disciplines to explore interdisciplinary approaches to serving the needs of older adults. Each class will be devoted to a discrete topic ranging from end-of-life care, to driving cessation, to surrogate decision making, to elder home abuse. Students will be offered readings from multiple disciplines relating to the topic of the week and one or two case study or studies of the week. The aim of the course is for students to learn how other disiplines might approach problems they encounter in their work with seniors, what other resources are available to assist them in their work with seniors, and how to work in a truly interdisciplinary manner with professionals from multiple disciplines.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 432

CCM 533. The History of Public Health in America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will analyze the changes, and crises, in public health in the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. After establishing the realities of medicine in the 19th century, episodes will be examined that helped shape our national sensibility about public health. From the treatment of Bubonic plague in San Francisco (1906) to scientific study in Tuskegee, Macon County, Alabama (1932-1972), from germ theory to AIDS, students will learn about the successes and failures in public health. Mistakes and accomplishments in the past can serve as useful tools for those who will shape the future of our health and health care.

CCM 534. Representatives of the Nurse. 3 Credit Hours.

How the nurse has been represented in literature, film and television is explored, focusing specifically at the relationships among images of nurses, ideologies of nursing, and the practice of nursing. Representations of nursing in late 19th century and 20th century texts are examined in relation to larger class and gender issues, including the ways in which the nurse threatened traditional notions of women. The social contexts of representations of nurses in late 20th century culture are analyzed, from Nurse Ratched in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest to the gay male nurse Belize in Angels in America, and stereotypes and iconoclastic figures are identified. Focusing on more recent literature, film and television, the figure of the nurse is considered in relation to contemporary concerns about the nursing profession such as the relationship between nurses and physicians, the economy of the hospital and health care, and the nursing shortage. Professional nurses guest lecture in the course.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 434

CCM 535. Bioethics and the Law. 3 Credit Hours.

Bioethics and the Law studies the challenging questions that occur at the intersection of law, medicine, and ethics. A focus of the course will be on examining key cases which reflect or have shaped the ethical and often societal consensus, as well as instances in which the law falls short of ethical norms. This seminar is open to medical, graduate nursing, and law students. Basic introductory sessions on the law (for nursing and law students) and clinical medicine (for law students) will start the course, as well as joint presentations on ethical theory. Topics include ethical issues surrounding pregnancy, assisted- reproductive technology, genetics, organ transplants, refusal of treatment based on religious or cross-cultural differences, clinical research, futile treatment, medical decisions at the end-of-life, and physician-assisted dying. The course requires thoughtful, vigorous class discussions of the material, with two papers.

CCM 536. Genetics, Disability and the Law. 3 Credit Hours.

This course studies the challenging questions that arise at the intersection of genetics, ethics, disability, and law. A focus of the course will be to explore how genetic diagnosis and information influences our understanding of disability, the ethical and social issues raised, and the legal rules that may apply to particular situations. This seminar course is open to medical, graduate nursing, graduate physician assistant, and law students. Basic introductory sessions on the law and on genomic medicine will start the course. Topics include ethical, legal, and social issues surrounding: genetics in reproductive medicine, prenatal diagnosis, and pre-implantation diagnosis; deciding for disabled newborns; non-voluntary sterilization; genetic privacy; genetic discrimination in employment and health insurance; and genetic research such as with stored tissues.

Prerequisites: Nursing and physician assistant students and prior health care ethics course.

CCM 537. Exploring Good Leadership. 3 Credit Hours.

Two premises underline this course: (1) Because of widespread deficiencies in leadership to address the complex and critical issues that threaten humankind, there is an urgent need for broadly educated, ethical leaders and (2) anyone who is an undergraduate, graduate, or professional student may be called to exert leadership now or in the future. This course will critically examine the skills and characteristics of good leaders, whether the leader operates on campus, in the local government, or in the world, and how they may be adapted to one's own style of leadership. Using short essays, reference materials, scenarios,interviews of leaders, and the students' own experiences, the topics explored will be, for example, What is Ethical Leadership?; Who Can Be a Leader?; How can Leadership be created?; Integrity and Reputation; Use of Power; Education of Leaders; Motivation and Higher Principles; Knowing Oneself; Learning from Heroes Mentors and Peers; Communicating Effectivele; Listening with a Prepared Mind; Evolution and Ethical Behavior; and Leadership Style.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 437

CCM 538. Global Health Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Global health is changing exponentially as shifts in global economy, climate, globalization of risk, emergent "new" diseases, re-emergent "old" diseases in new places, re-engineered aid architecture, and increasingly more effective medical interventions become available. Opportunities for creative programming, policy-making, and employment in the international context abound. This course aims to create a learning environment that actively engages students and immerses them in global health through active reflection and discussion around current news events, live conversations with professionals in the field, real-time project collaboration with global colleagues, and relevant course exercises. The goal is to give students practical experience and immersion in global health thinking with one another and with colleagues.

CCM 539. Child Health Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Children's health is influenced by a host of factors, not least of which is policy. It may be influenced by policy directly at a medical level, or less directly at a child-serving systems level (eg. public health, education, juvenile justice). This course will cover how child health policy is developed, implemented, evaluated, and influenced, with a focus on how child health policy is influenced by circumstances beyond the traditional boundaries of "health care". Students will examine how law and medicine (specifically "child health") interact, hearing from a variety of disciplinary and community-based perspectives. Students will discuss how expertise from various sources might be joined to enhance the effectiveness of child health policy.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 439

CCM 540. Disability, Medicine and Representation. 3 Credit Hours.

This course aims to bring disability and medicine into cross-disciplinary dialogue by examining representations of disability and medicine in film, literature, and medical texts. These texts and conventions are considered in light of critical discussions of representation and disability. The "medicalization" of disability is examined, with students invited to explore disability and ability as cultural representations, wherein bodily abilities and limitations are conditioned by subjective perceptions of "normalcy". A principal question is how to incorporate a "social model" of disability into medical education and practice. Disability studies scholars and clinicians working on disability will be guest speakers.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 440

CCM 541. Global Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines global health from an anthropological perspective. It explores the political and social circumstances which shaped the development of international health. It examines how culture shapes both the conditions under which people experience morbidity and mortality and their responses to illness. Topics considered include the development of international health, epidemiological and anthropological research methods, gender and health, reproductive health, infectious disease, health and inequality, and the health consequences of war.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 441

CCM 542. Native American Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses Native American Public Health in four areas. First, the course covers the historical roots of health desparities among Native Americans. Second, students will review the epidemiology of disease, risk factors, and causes of death among Native Americans in Nations across the United States. Third, the course examines indigenous food ways and the contemporary diets of Native Americans to understand the barriers to healthy diets in contemporary Native American culture. Last, the course will cover substance abuse and addictions among Native Americans and consider Native American indigenous knowledge as an adjunct to chemical dependency treatment.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 442

CCM 543. Disability and Public Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore factors influencing the health and well-being of persons with disabilities, including models of disability, disability history, law and services, health disparities, health promotion, ethics, violence, and disaster preparedness. Students will be prepared to better understand one of the largest minority populations in the United States and that people with disability constitute a group that is relevant to every facet of diversity and culture. Given that the experiences of disability touches all aspects of society,this course will prepare students to take disability into account in work related to health and well-being.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 443

CCM 544. Native American Health and Wellness. 3 Credit Hours.

This course begins with an overview of the historical roots of health disparities among Native Americans. Students will then examine the experience of diseases, risk factors, and causes of death among Native Americans in Nations across the United States, including the role of substance abuse in contributing to health disparities. The last portion of the course considers the many aspects of Native American culture that contribute to wellness, including indigenous food ways, fitness, and Native American indigenous knowledge as an adjunct to chemical dependency treatment.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 444

CCM 545. Public Health Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines ethical issues in public health. Public health ethics is a new area of scholarship practice that addresses population-level health issues, such as issues of food stamps and health insurance, immunizations, public health research, legal and policy responses to infectious diseases and epidemics, and the role of religious and social values in setting health policy.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 445

CCM 546. Culture, Communication, and Ethics in Health Care. 3 Credit Hours.

Ethical, empathic, and effective health care involves good communication, reflection, and a social and cultural knowledge and skills. this course provides a model for collaborative and culturally sensitive and skilled communication in health care. Through the study of ethics cases, narratives, and literature, students will analyze disparities and discrimination in health care for people who are deaf and disabled. Students will explore solutions through deaf studies, disability studies, and narrative approaches to bioethics and health care. Guest speakers will include members of the Deaf community, disability studies scholars and advocates, sign language interpreters, and health care professionals.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 446

CCM 560. Law and Reproductive Rights. 3 Credit Hours.

The law touches on every aspect of our lives, including the most intimate and personal decisions we make concerning our reproduction, our sexuality, and our very identities. This course will focus on the ways in which lawmakers and judges have tried to create policy dealing with these extremely difficult issues, as well as what those outside of the courts and legislatures have argued about what the government's role should be in this area. Selected topics to be covered include abortion, the regulation of birth and motherhood, LGBT rights and policy, birth control and sex education.

Cross-listed Courses: CCM 460