Biochemistry

Biochemistry has grown to occupy an important and influential position in both of its parent disciplines, chemistry and biology. The biochemistry major offers an interdisciplinary curriculum that is designed to allow students to focus on either the biological or the chemical aspects of the boundary region between these two disciplines. A major in biochemistry can prepare students for advanced studies in biochemistry, biology or chemistry; for advanced studies in the health professions; for employment in the pharmaceutical or biotechnology industries or (with further study) for careers in public health policy or patent or environmental law.

The director of the major is in the Department of Chemistry; however, because of the interdisciplinary nature of the program, curricular oversight is shared with the Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences.

Student Learning Outcomes in Biochemistry

Students who graduate from this program will be able to:

Key concepts
Students who graduate with a Le Moyne degree in biochemistry will have skillfully applied key concepts in biological chemistry and molecular biology to systems at the interface of chemistry and biology.
 
Laboratory procedures
Students who graduate with a Le Moyne degree in biochemistry will have successfully carried out a broad range of laboratory investigations utilizing specialized equipment relevant to the discipline.
 
Analyze systems
Students who graduate with a Le Moyne degree in biochemistry will have analyzed chemical or biological systems using appropriate conceptual models.
 
Scientific method
Students who graduate with a Le Moyne degree in biochemistry will have constructed or critiqued the design of an experiment in biochemistry or molecular biology.
 
Quantitative reasoning skills
Students who graduate with a Le Moyne degree in biochemistry will have competently applied quantitative reasoning skills to biochemical systems.
 
Communication and literature
Students who graduate with a Le Moyne degree in biochemistry will have reported scientific and technical information clearly and critically in a style appropriate to the discipline.