Integral Honors

Program Director: Matthew Fee

The Integral Honors Program offers exceptional students both a unique educational experience and the opportunity to earn the highest academic distinction that Le Moyne College confers upon its graduates. The program serves all majors. To earn an Integral Honors degree students take a series of Honors courses taught by faculty from departments across the college and include individually and team-taught classes. The Honors curriculum takes the place of much of the Core curriculum that all Le Moyne students complete, with a few exceptions. In addition to class work, all Honors students complete a thesis, or capstone, project. Completion of all requirements earns a student the Integral Honors degree.

Students apply for admission to the Integral Honors Program during their senior year of high school, although some spots are open for students who choose to apply during their first semester, once they have started their course work at Le Moyne. During the first and second years, students typically take four foundational Honors courses in Theology, English, Philosophy, and History, where students have the opportunity to challenge themselves with in depth exploration of texts and methodologies within these disciplines. 

After the first year, Honors students take a series of team-taught interdisciplinary seminars on various topics. Honors students complete HON 380 Interdisciplinary Honors Thesis Research, in their third year. This course prepares the students to complete their Honors thesis, which explores the epistemologies and methodologies of various disciplines; each student then applies this knowledge by developing and researching his or her own interdisciplinary honors thesis project under the guidance of a professor-mentor. HON 480 Honors Thesis Project continues the research and writing of the honors thesis throughout the senior year, culminating in the public presentation of the thesis project at Le Moyne’s Scholars Day at the end of the spring semester.

To maintain Integral Honors status, a student must earn a minimum grade of B- in each honors course. A minimum overall GPA of 3.25 and completion of all honors courses are also required for graduation with the Integral Honors degree.

Students in the Integral Honors Program pay regular tuition but have the privilege of taking extra courses without charge. Such added hours may not be applied, however, to early graduation, and any summer, May-mester or J-mester courses require payment of regular tuition.

For further information, please see Interdisciplinary Programs or contact the program director.

Integral Honors (HON)

HON 110. Integrl Hon Interdiscipl Seminar I: Phl. 3 Credit Hours.

Offered every spring semester, tandem-taught Interdisciplinary Seminar 1 is the first required course in the Honors Program curriculum. The tandem courses will be English and Philosophy one year, alternating with English and Theology the next year, with students receiving 3 credits for each course in the tandem seminar. Students must enroll in both courses the same semester, as the course readings and assignments are coordinated by the two professors to provide opportunities for team-teaching, interdisciplinary paper topics and writing workshops, joint guest lectures, and common co-curricular activities. Interdisciplinary Seminar 1, a writing-instructional seminar, introduces students to honors-level critical reading and critical writing in the humanities disciplines. Daily class discussions of the reading assignments enhance students' critical thinking and reading skills while modeling the art of respectful and effective intellectual debate. At least one assignment will include an off-campus curricular or co-curricular activity.

HON 111. Integrl Hon Interdiscipl Seminar I: Eng. 3 Credit Hours.

Offered every spring semester, tandem-taught Interdisciplinary Seminar 1 is the first required course in the Honors Program curriculum. The tandem courses will be English and Philosophy one year, alternating with English and Theology the next year, with students receiving 3 credits for each course in the tandem seminar. Students must enroll in both courses the same semester, as the course readings and assignments are coordinated by the two professors to provide opportunities for team-teaching, interdisciplinary paper topics and writing workshops, joint guest lectures, and common co-curricular activities. Interdisciplinary Seminar 1, a writing-instructional seminar, introduces students to honors-level critical reading and critical writing in the humanities disciplines. Daily class discussions of the reading assignments enhance students' critical thinking and reading skills while modeling the art of respectful and effective intellectual debate. At least one assignment will include an off-campus curricular or co-curricular activity.

HON 112. Intgrl Honrs Interdisc Semimar I: THE. 3 Credit Hours.

Offered every spring semester, tandem-taught Interdisciplinary Seminar 1 is the first required course in the Honors Program curriculum. The tandem courses will be English and Philosophy one year, alternating with English and Theology the next year, with students receiving 3 credits for each course in the tandem seminar. Students must enroll in both courses the same semester, as the course readings and assignments are coordinated by the two professors to provide opportunities for team-teaching, interdisciplinary paper topics and writing workshops, joint guest lectures, and common co-curricular activities. Interdisciplinary Seminar 1, a writing-instructional seminar, introduces students to honors-level critical reading and critical writing in the humanities disciplines. Daily class discussions of the reading assignments enhance students-critical thinking and reading skills while modeling the art of respectful and effective intellectual debate. At least one assignment will include an off-campus curricular or co-curricular activity.

HON 115. World Civilizations-Honors. 3 Credit Hours.

Through extensive readings of both primary and secondary sources this course surveys the most important developments, issues, accomplishments and problems of Western civilization since approximately 1800, discusses the impact of that civilization on major world civilizations, and examines the development of African, Asian, Islamic, Native American and Latin American civilizations since 1800. Emphasis will be placed on the issues surrounding colonialism and its impact through Asia, Africa and the Americas. As with all Honors courses, this course will be Writing Instructive with a heavy emphasis on the production of a research paper. Students will be required to submit a research proposal, annotated bibliography, and at least one initial draft of their research paper.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Honors Program.

HON 215. Integral Honors Id Seminar 2. 3 Credit Hours.

Offered every fall semester, HON 215 is a team-taught seminar that honors students typically take in their second year. The seminar topic crafted by the two professors teaching the course is narrowly focused for a deep and intense engagement with the course material. Each HON 215 seminar explores a specific theme or historical moment by integrating several disciplines and concentrating on a select number of texts from those disciplines. HON 215 includes at minimum the disciplines of literature, philosophy, theology/religious studies, and history, as well as other disciplines of the instructors' choosing. Daily class discussions enhance students' critical reading skills and model the art of respectful and effective intellectual debate. Writing assignments in this writing-instructive/writing-intensive course focus on critical writing about interdisciplinary texts and themes; writing assignments will include one 10-12 page critical paper. At least one assignment will include an off-campus curricular or co-curricular activity. Open only to students in the Integral Honors Program.

Prerequisites: WRT 101, HON 110.

HON 225. Integral Honors Id Seminar 3. 3 Credit Hours.

Offered every spring semester, HON 225 is a team-taught interdisciplinary seminar that honors students typically take in the spring semester of their second year. The seminar topic crafted by the two professors teaching the course is narrowly focused for a deep and intense engagement with the course material. Each HON 225 seminar explores a specific theme or historical moment by integrating several disciplines and concentrating on a select number of texts from those disciplines. HON 225, like the other team0taught honors seminars, includes coursework in the disciplines of literature, philosophy, religion, history, and other disciplines of the faculty team's choosing. Daily class discussions not only enhance students' critical reading and speaking skills but teach the art of respectful and effective intellectual debate. At least one assignment in HON 225 will include an off-campus curricular or co-curricular activity. Writing assignments in this writing-instructive course focus on critical writing about interdisciplinary themes and texts. The major writing assignment in HON 225 is designed to prepare students for the honors thesis: The Interdisciplinary Research Project, a semester-long project of the student's choosing entailing scholarly research. The IRP can be a creative project, a natural or social science research study, or some other scholarly or artistic project of the student's devising. For students who study abroad or need to accelerate their honors thesis writing schedules, HON 225 may be taken together with HON 380, with permission from the Honors Director secured in the student's second year. Open Only to Integral Honors Program students.

Prerequisites: WRT 101: HON 111.

HON 320. The World of the Other. 3 Credit Hours.

An interdisciplinary course on the contemporary world that will address philosophical, social, religious, literary, and scientific issues from diverse perspectives but full immersed within a context of modernization, underdevelopment, and dependency. Taught on campus and in Latin America by Le Moyne College faculty, the course also features lectures by guest speakers from the Rafael Landivar University, a Jesuit institution, in Guatemala City and in Quetzaltenango. The course is open to Non-Honor students with permission of the instructors. NOTE: There are additional travel expenses associated with this course for the travel component. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of the instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: COR 400I

HON 351. Interdisciplinary Seminar: Bioethics. 3 Credit Hours.

When and where the implications and practices of biological sciences meet ethics we have bioethics. This course introduces students to a variety of current ethical issues in biology including topics in genetics and biotechnology, reproductive technology, environmental issues such as biodiversity and use (and abuse) of natural resources, and biomedical ethics. Understanding and application of value choices and ethics is emphasized.

Prerequisites: HON 215 or permission from Honors Director.

HON 380. Interdisciplinary Honors Thesis Research. 3 Credit Hours.

In this course, each Honors student chooses or creates an interdisciplinary honors thesis project in consultation with the Honors director, who teaches the course, and with a faculty mentor of the student's choosing. Creative and artistic projects, science, social science, and business research studies, historical research papers, and other interdisciplinary projects are all acceptable as thesis projects when informed by sustained academic research. Students research their thesis projects throughout the semester and complete their research by the end of the course. At mid-semester, each student submits a thesis proposal that must be approved before he or she may continue with the thesis. As the final writing assignment for the course, each student writes a rough draft of the thesis introduction and an analytical review of the current scholarly research in the field of his or her thesis.

Prerequisites: HON 110 or HON 112; HON 111; HON 225.

HON 480. Honors Thesis Project. 3 Credit Hours.

Under the direction of a mentor, the honors student accomplishes an independent project as the culmination of his or her work in the Integral Honors Program.