Information Systems

Chair: Dennis O'Connor 

Program Director: Martha Grabowski (of Information Systems)

Professor: Martha Grabowski, Shin-Jeng Lin

Assistant Professor: Yue Han

Adjunct Faculty: William Barrett, Elizabeth DaRin, Michael Dermody, Bill Gape, Gary Krudys, Ingrid Norris, Camille Tisdel

All disciplines are experiencing growth in computer use, and students who enrich their knowledge of information systems are at a career advantage. The Information Systems (IS) major program is designed to serve students with educational and career interests in information systems, as well as those students who have other career and educational interests and who desire knowledge of Information Systems.

To respond to differing student and employer needs and interests, Le Moyne offers several different offerings in Information Systems:

Students who are interested in the development, application, use and theory of Information Systems can pursue a B.S. in Business Administration, Information Systems major. Students interested in combining an interest in other areas of Business Administration with an interest in Information Systems may pursue a joint major with Business Analytics, Human Resources, Marketing, Management and Leadership, or Finance; a concentration in Information Systems for Accounting majors; or a dual major with Computer Science in Software Applications and Systems Development (SASD).

IS students may pursue certification in Oracle, SAP, project management, IBM System Z or Microsoft server/networking through their coursework and through the College's University Alliance programs.

In addition, students may apply for an accelerated M.S., in Information Systems through Le Moyne or through Syracuse University's School of Information Studies as early as their junior year through Le Moyne's 4+1/Fast Track Express Path program (see the following information).

IS students also participate in Formation Abroad, an experiential learning opportunity that combines academic study at a Jesuit institution overseas, experiential learning with IS Program partners in the locale, and volunteer immersion experiences; Formation Abroad links learning, reflection and action in service for others, consistent with Jesuit ideals and values. 

Interested students are encouraged to discuss these choices with their advisor or the Information Systems program director to determine which offering best meets their needs.

Students majoring in Information Systems are encouraged to pursue internship opportunities as part of their academic experience. Exceptional students are encouraged to participate in Honors study in Information Systems, pursuing a research topic of their choice with a faculty mentor. IS students also have the opportunity to pursue independent research as McDevitt Information Systems Research Fellows through support from the McDevitt Center.  MSIS students have the opportunity to pursue graduate research through completion of a Master's thesis, working with a graduate faculty mentor. 

Information Systems Major

Undergraduate Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Students graduating from the Information Systems program in the Madden School of Business at Le Moyne College will be able to:

  • Identify the role and impact of information systems in organizations, 
  • Demonstrate analytical thinking through data and enterprise systems analysis, design and development capabilities, and
  • Analyze and resolve ethical and corporate social responsibility issues and problems by evaluating and proposing alternative courses of action. 
 

4+1 Dual Bachelor's/Master's Degree in Information Systems, Express Path, at Le Moyne College

The College's MSIS Express Path program allows students to earn their undergraduate degree in any field in four years and their MSIS at Le Moyne College in just one additional year of study. When they graduate, our alumni are distinguished by their ability to lead and to tackle complex issues as they respond to the needs of an ever-changing world.

The timeline for the 4+1 Dual Bachelor's/MSIS Program Express Path is as follows: 

March 1 of the junior year - complete the MSIS application process for admission by providing: application form, two letters of recommendation, and a personal statement. Students must have a 3.3 grade-point average. Neither the GMAT nor the GRE are required. (Notification of pre-approved admission to the Express Path will be made on a rolling basis. Final admission to the MSIS program will be conditional on completion of your undergraduate program.)

Upon completion of the junior year - Students will show fulfillment, or will fulfill, the two foundation graduate course requirements with a grade of "B" or better (or their undergraduate equivalents: see below) for the MSIS Program: MIS 501 Management Information Systems and MIS 601 Information Strategy and Management. This may be achieved in several ways. A maximum of 9 graduate credit hours (i.e., three graduate level courses) may be taken upon completion of a student's junior year.

Summer or Fall after completing undergraduate requirements - The remainder of the 30 MSIS credit hours can be completed in 12 months if the student is enrolled full time during the fall, spring, and summer semesters, as well as during the J-mester and Maymester. Students may also complete the program on a part-time basis.

To view the M.S. requirements, visit the Information Systems (M.S.) Program page. For more information, please contact Dr. Martha Grabowski, Information Systems Program Director.

4+1 Fast Track Dual Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree program in Information Systems, with Syracuse University 

B.S. Business Administration/Information Systems
Le Moyne College
M.S., Information Management
Syracuse University, School of Information Studies

This program allows Le Moyne students with a major in Business Administration/Information Systems, a major in Computer Science, or a dual major in Information Systems and Computer Science (SASD) to complete a Master’s degree program in Information Management at Syracuse University by taking Syracuse University graduate courses as early as their junior year at Le Moyne College.

Students complete the program with one or two semesters of additional course work beyond their Le Moyne undergraduate program. For example, they may take graduate courses at Syracuse University in the summer of their junior year, and complete the program in the summer or fall immediately following their graduation from Le Moyne. Le Moyne students enrolled in the 4+1 Fast Track program can participate in internships through Le Moyne and/or Syracuse University, and are supported with a graduate assistantship at Syracuse during their time at S.U.

The agreement also stipulates that Le Moyne students in the 4+1 program will be charged Le Moyne tuition for their S.U. courses, rather than S.U. tuition. For students who come in with transfer, I.B. or AP credit, this could mean that they may be able to graduate on time with both the bachelor’s degree from Le Moyne and a master’s degree from S.U. and no change in status with respect to their financial aid.

For more information, please contact Dr. Martha Grabowski, Information Systems Program Director.

Management Information Systems (MIS)

MIS 175. Introduction to Algorithms and Program Design. 4 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to prgamming with an emphasis on computational problem-solving. Topics include program design and testing strategies, programming language syntax and semantics, scalar data types and an introduction to data structures, control structures, iteration, recursion, file input/output exceptions as well as introduction to algroithm analysis. Students will use a high-level programming language to develop programs and reinforce their understanding of topics.

Cross-listed Courses: CSC 175

MIS 175L. Lab. 0 Credit Hour.

Cross-listed Courses: CSC 175L

MIS 176. Object Oriented Programming. 3 Credit Hours.

This course continues the study of program development introduced in CSC 175. Topics include intermediate program design, object oriented programming (objects, types, inheritance, and polymorphism), basic data structures such as arrays and strings, and event-driven programming using a graphical user interface (GUI). Students will use a high-level programming language to complete several intermediate sized programming projects to reinforce concepts. Student may not take both CSC 170 and CSC 176.

Prerequisites: CSC 155, CSC 165, or CSC 175 or permission of the program director.

Cross-listed Courses: CSC 170, MIS 325

MIS 201. Introduction to Management Info Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of the concepts and methodologies of information systems. The course focuses on the idea of information systems support for competitive decision-making, thus blending technical with managerial topics. Students will develop familiarity with the principles of information systems as well as hands-on experience with a variety of information systems tools and techniques.

MIS 325. Introduction to Java Programming Programming. 4 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce you to programming and object oriented programming using Java. General programming topics include program design, testing strategies, and control structures such as conditionals, iteration. Object oriented topics include creating and using classes, inheritance and interfaces. Students will also learn about basic data structures such as arrays and strings. Students will solve programming problems in weekly lab sessions. Graduate students in the course will also be introduced to event-driven programming using a graphical user interface (GUI), recursion, and 2-dimensional arrays.

Cross-listed Courses: CSC 170, MIS 525

MIS 326. COBOL Programming. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a study of the COBOL programming language, with application of its features for table handling, sorting, sequential and random access file handling and modular programming.

Cross-listed Courses: CSC 155

MIS 335. Client Side Web Application Development. 3 Credit Hours.

As more and more businesses and individuals turn to the Web for sharing information and conducting commercial activities, a quality web site can provide competitive advantage and invite users for repetitive visits. The key to a quality and successful web site lies in both the content and usability of the site. To increase understanding of web usability, this course will engage students in an exploration of fundamental concepts in web design and development processes with hands-on exercises. This course explores the factors influencing web site usability throughout the design process, including requirements analysis, conceptual design, mockups and prototypes, production, and web site evaluation. Students will also learn to use client-side scripting techniques to enhance web usability.

Cross-listed Courses: MKT 335, MIS 635

MIS 340. Data Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will provide you the knowledge and techniques to approach phenomena analytically. Specially, you will learn the role and process of the data science lifecycle in understanding and gaining insight about phenomena, including how to ask the appropriate questions, identify the appropriate data and information needed, use the appropriate tools to analyze a large volume of data, evaluate the findings effectively with parameters, find the appropriate answers, and present the answers and compellingly. In the business context such knowledge can enable organizations to make quality decisions and develop important business strategies that can enhance organizational performance and that can contribute to significant financial gains. You will proficiently acquire such knowledge and techniques through class discussion, lectures, readings, as well as hand-on exercises. Prerequisite(s): STA 202 or MTH 112.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 740

MIS 350. Accounting Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine the design, control and operation of accounting information systems with a strong emphasis on integration. The course will present a thorough introduction to basic information systems theory, provide a working knowledge of systems analysis and design techniques, databases and enterprise systems. Understanding and appreciation of accounting information systems is critical to successfully managing, auditing and developing systems to support today's evolving business environment. This course offers a focused look at accounting information systems as part of enterprise resource planning systems, with a focus on SAP and other comparable enterprise systems to demonstrate concepts. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or above in MIS 201, and in either ACT 203 and ACT 204, or in ACT 201 and ACT 202.

Cross-listed Courses: ACT 350

MIS 375. Applied Systems Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces the nature and techniques of information systems analysis, design and implementation. The course topics include requirements definition, analysis and design of information systems; system implementation and evaluation; object-oriented analysis and design; and current trends in systems analysis and design. Students demonstrate their knowledge by completing a systems analysis and design project.

Prerequisite: MIS 201 or permission of the instructor.

MIS 385. Developing Decision Support Applications With Visual Basic. 3 Credit Hours.

This class covers the basics of structured programming using Visual Basic to develop decision support systems or management science applications. The theory and practice of structured programming, logic, systems development are covered in a series of iterative hands-on assignments, which are designed based on practical decision support systems or management science applications. Students can expect to learn how to create and program advanced Excel applications or other equivalent applications. A term project involving the development and documentation of a Visual basic program is required.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 785, CSC 165

MIS 399. Independent Study in Information Systems. 1-6 Credit Hours.

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration, a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and the goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the program director and Dean of the Madden School. The proposal will be kept on file in the office of the Dean of the Madden School. The hours and credit are to be determined by the student and the program director.

MIS 415. Business Intelligence. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to Business Intelligence, including the processes, methodologies, infrastructure, and current practices used to transform business data into useful information and support business decision-making. Business Intelligence requires foundation knowledge in data storage and retrieval, thus this course will review logical data models for both database management systems and data warehouses. Students will learn to extract and manipulate data from these systems and assess security-related issues. Data mining, visualization, and statisical analysis along with reporting options such as management dashboards and balanced scorecards will be covered. Technologies utilized in the course included SAP Business Warehouse, SAP Business Objects, Crystal Reports, and RapidMiner.

Prerequisite: MIS 201 or permission of the instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 716, MKT 415

MIS 420. Marketing Analytics. 3 Credit Hours.

With the increased use of big data creating a paradigm shift in how marketers make decisions, the need to be able to extract meaningful information from this voluminous amount of data to make smarter decisions is becoming more important than ever. The course will provide students with the tools to develop a systematic, analytical approach to marketing decision making. The course aims at preparing students to (1)understand the value of competitive advantages leveraged by analytics; (2) understand the existence, advantages and limitations of different analytical approaches; and (3) to apply, interpret the input, and communicate the output from these tools and models, and apply them to help make fact-based decisions. The course takes on a hands-on experiential approach with real-world databases to facilitate the comprehension of the different analytical approaches discussed in class.

Prerequisites: MKT 301, STA 202.

Cross-listed Courses: MKT 420

MIS 435. Introduction to Government Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on introductory government systems concepts, processes and functions, utilizing the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR). Students will examine FAR regulations, processes and nomenclature, utilizing existing and proposed regulations and industry case studies, and appropriate support technology. Guest speakers and field research provide students with access and information from industry and academia.

Prerequisites: ACT 202 or ACT 204.

Cross-listed Courses: BUS 435, ACT 435, FIN 435, MIS 535

MIS 445. Mobile Applications and Business Strategies. 3 Credit Hours.

The course explores the important challenges and connect with their stakeholders. Students will learn the technical, managerial and marketing aspects of mobile applications. Technically, they will learn the development process and technical infrastructure of mobile applications. Mangerially, students will learn how to develop business strategies to exploit mobile applications for the advancing and repositioning of organizations. For marketing, students will learn to market the newly developed mobile applications and at the same time to use mobile applications to market and promote the organizations and their products or services.

Prerequisites: MIS 201 or permission of instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: MKT 445, MIS 715, MKT 715

MIS 450. Health Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with the knowledge of the design, use, and evaluation issues of health informatics applications. The topics include: (1) health informatics as a discipline; (2)career options for health informatics; (3)major health applications and commercial vendors; (4) strategic information systems planning; and (5) new opportunities and emerging trends.

Prerequisites: MIS 201 or permission of instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: NSG 387, NSG 697, MIS 710

MIS 455. Managing the Technological Enterprise. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the requirements, management and performance of enterprises engaged in the use of technology. Requirements determination, analysis, design and cost management activities for technological enterprises are covered; a focus on the management of life cycle costs is emphasized. The management of third party organizations, outsourcing and project management activities are also covered. The legal, environmental and ethical issues associated with the management and performance of technological enterprises are important components of this course. Guest speakers and case studies from local, national and international technological enterprises, agencies and regulatory organizations are employed in this course.

Prerequisites: MIS 201 or permission of instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 717

MIS 460. Managing Systems Projects. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on introductory project management processes, technology and tools, utilizing the Project Management Institute's (PMI) Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) and the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI's) Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) processes and nomenclature. Students examine the processes and theory of project management as well as industry case studies, and will utilize project management software in support of their management activities. Guest speakers and field research provide students with access and information from industry and academia. Students are engaged in a semester-long project. Initially, they are required to identify the project scope and team charter for their project; subsequent assignments require them to prepare a business case, work breakdown structure, cost estimate, and final project documentation for their project.

Cross-listed Courses: CSC 460, MGT 460, MIS 711, NSG 611

MIS 465. Electronic Business. 3 Credit Hours.

Electronic business offers exciting and innovative ways of doing business that can restructure corporations and enhance business performance. The objective of this course is to help students understand the essentials of electronic business and learn how to successfully develop an electronic business plan. The course focuses on the infrastructures of electronic business, including e-business technologies, strategies, capital, media and public policy. Students will explore electronic business design from the front and back end, taking a dynamic business environment into account. The front end focuses on customer relationship management, including market analysis, brand name building and interface issues. The back end focuses on business process reengineering and various capital management techniques. Issues in the business environment, including media and public policy, will be explored.

Prerequisite: MIS 201 or permission of the instructor.

MIS 478. Financial Telecomm & Cybersecurity. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of the concepts and principles of telecommunications systems and networks, blending technical with managerial topics. Students will focus on the challenges inherent in securing financial telecommunications networks, particularly the challenges of insider threats. Students will local area networks, wide area networks, wireless networks, value-added networks, as well as other networks. Students will complete a series of network installation and test projects, and will analyze network design cases throughout the semester. Guest speakers from industry and case studies from on-going research will provide a real-world contect for the topics discussed in class. Students may sit for network certification following completion of the course.

Prerequisites: MIS 201, or permission of the instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: FIN 478, MIS 712

MIS 480. Database Management Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of the concepts and principles of database management systems, blending technical with managerial topics. Students will study the principles of database structures, the database development process, entity-relationship and object-oriented database models, logical and physical database designs, SQL, as well as distributed and object-oriented databases. Students will also examine data warehouses, as well as the challenges of global electronic data management, electronic commerce and ethical issues associated with the increasing integration and complexity of large-scale data sets. Students will complete a database design project during the semester.

Prerequisites: MIS 201 or permission of the instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: CSC 480

MIS 485. Topics in Large Scale Computing. 3 Credit Hours.

The course focuses on introductory large-scale computing topics, utilities, SDSF and CICS. Students will participate in hands-on projects utilizing large-scale computing. Guest speakers and field research will be utilized to provide students access and information from industry and academia. Students develop the technical and business foundations for the effective use of large-scale computing in organizations in this class.

MIS 485L. Lab Hours. 0 Credit Hour.

MIS 486. Managing Systems Projects. 3 Credit Hours.

Special Topics: This course focuses on introductory project management processes, technology and tools, utiliziing the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI's) Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) processes and nomenclature. Students will participate in hands-on software development projects. Guest speakers and field research will be utilized to provide students access and information from industry and academia. Students develop the technical and business foundations for the effective development and use of computing in organizations in this class.

MIS 489L. Lab Hours. 0 Credit Hour.

MIS 490. Information Systems Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours.

Participation in a real-world learning experience is provided in internship opportunities. The intern reports as required to a faculty member, and both student and faculty member assess the internship as it relates to the student's academic program and desired organizational experiences. Six hours of approved work experience is required to generate one credit.

Prerequisite: permission of the program director.

MIS 495. Special Topic in Information Systems Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

Information systems, composed of technology, people, information, systems, organizations, policies, and society, contain many complex and interdependent elements. The large-scale systems within which many information systems reside, including organizations, technology systems, communitites, nations, and even human biological systems, can be similarly complex with interdependent elements. Information systems researchers study technology, people, information, organizations and systems in order to understand information systems, and the interactions between and the impacts of those elements and information systems, on individuals, groups, organizations, and other systems.

Prerequisite: MIS 201; Junior or Senior standing;or permission of instructor.

MIS 499. Independ Study in Info Systems (Honors). 3 Credit Hours.

This course is intended for honors students and is required for the honors degree in Information Systems. The student conducts an independent research project under the guidance of at least one faculty member in the program. The Honors Committee evaluates a written and oral presentation of the research project. This course may only be taken by permission of the program director.

MIS 501. Management Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of management information systems (MIS) and their structure is provided through case analysis. Topics covered include the underlying concept of information, decision-making, management and how organizations affect the design of information systems. The impact of information systems on human behavior, organizations and societies is analyzed. Information resources management models underlie the technical and management focus of the course. Students are expected to complete group and individual projects using commercially available spreadsheet, database and systems analysis software packages.

MIS 525. Introduction to Java Programming Programming. 4 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce you to programming and object oriented programming using Java. General programming topics include program design, testing strategies, and control structures such as conditionals, iteration. Object oriented topics include creating and using classes, inheritance and interfaces. Students will also learn about basic data structures such as arrays and strings. Students will solve programming problems in weekly lab sessions. Graduate students in the course will also be introduced to event-driven programming using a graphical user interface (GUI), recursion, and 2-dimensional arrays.

Cross-listed Courses: CSC 170, MIS 325

MIS 535. Intro to Government Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on introductory government systems concepts, processes and functions, utilizing the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR). Students will examine FAR regulations, processes and nmenclature, utilizing existing and proposed regulations and industry case studies, and appropriate support technology. Guest speakers and field research provide students with access and information from industy and academia.

Prerequisites: MIS 201 or permission of instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: BUS 435, ACT 435, FIN 435, MIS 435

MIS 550. Accounting Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine the design, control and operation of accounting information systems with a strong emphasis on integration. The course will present a thorough introduction to basic information systems theory, provide a working knowledge of systems analysis and design techniques, databases and enterprise systems. Understanding and appreciation of accounting information systems is critical to successfully managing, auditing and developing systems to support today's evolving business environment. This course offers a focused look at accounting information systems as part of enterprise resource planning systems, with a focus on SAP and other comparable enterprise systems to demonstrate concepts. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or above in MIS 201 (or MIS 501), and in either ACT 203 and ACT 204, or in ACT 201 and ACT 202.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 350, ACT 350, ACT 550

MIS 601. Information Strategy and Management. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the management, strategies and performance of enterprises engaged in the use of information for competitive advantage. IT alignment with business goals and enterprise resource planning (ERP) tools, techniques and processes are introduced. Modeling and managing life cycle costs, and the impact on competitive advantage, are covered in the course. The management of third party organizations, vendors, outsourcing, and the legal, ethical and environmental impacts of such activities, are important components of this course. Students will complete and present a semester-long project in enterprise resource planning. Guest speakers and case studies from local, national and international technological enterprises, agencies, and regulatory organizations are employed in this course.

MIS 635. Client Side Web Applicatons Development. 3 Credit Hours.

As more and more businesses and individuals turn to the Web for sharing information and conducting commercial activities, a quality web site can provide competitive advantage and invite users for repetitive visits. The key to a quality and successful web site lies in both the content and usability of the site. To increase understanding of web usability, this course will engage students in an exploration of fundamental concepts in web design and development processes with hands-on exercises. This course explores the factors influencing web site usability throughout the design process, including requirements analysis, conceptual design, mockups and prototypes, production, and web site evaluation. Students will also learn to use client-side scripting techniques to enhance web usability.

Cross-listed Courses: MKT 335, MIS 335

MIS 701. Database Management Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course develops the framework for database systems analysis and design. Course topics focus on database design, data modeling, data integrity, security, database management approaches and techniques and distributed databases. Students are expected to complete a database project using commercially available software packages.

Prerequisite: MIS 501.

MIS 703. Systems Analysis and Design. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides the building blocks for analysis and design of management information systems. The systems development life cycle, information gathering techniques, data and process modeling techniques and management of the systems analysis and design processes are covered. Students apply the concepts introduced using computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools.

Prerequisite: MIS 501.

MIS 704. Communication, Networks,teleconferencing. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the management challenges of communications systems, signals and noise. This course considers the problems and limitations associated with interconnecting computers by communications networks. Topics include protocols, interface design, queuing, multiplexing, coding and network configurations.

Prerequisite: MIS 501.

MIS 706. Electronic Commerce. 3 Credit Hours.

Electronic commerce offers exciting and innovative ways of doing business that can enhance organizational performance and restructure corporations. This course is intended to help students understand the fundamentals of electronic commerce and addresses both technical and operational topics. Technical topics covered include back-end database connectivity and information storage and processing. Operational topics include electronic commerce business models, marketing, transactions, security and legal and ethical issues. Through lectures and project exercises, students are expected to develop new frameworks of thinking and practice, tailored to their professional interests.

Prerequisite: MIS 501.

MIS 707. Risk Mgmt in Large Scale Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the challenges associated with risk management in large-scale systems. It considers the nature of social, organizational and technological risk and discusses the role of risk analytic, risk management and risk communications. It also discusses several analytic approaches to risk management and mitigation and analyzes case studies of risk in several large-scale systems: aerospace, biomedical, global networks, healthcare, transportation and safety-critical domains such as firefighting and oil spill response. Using several strategic models, students discuss the importance of tactical and strategic risk management and employ several of the models in case analyses.

Prerequisite: MIS 501.

MIS 710. Health Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with the knowledge of the design, use, and evaluation issues of health informatics applications. The topics include: (1) health informatics as a discipline; (2) career options for health informatics; (3) major health applications and commercial vendors; (4) strategic information systems planning; and (5) new opportunities and emerging trends.

Cross-listed Courses: NSG 387, NSG 697, MIS 450

MIS 711. Managing Systems Project. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on introductory project management processes, technology and tools, utilizing the Project Management Institute's (PMI) Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) and the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI's) Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) processes and nomenclature. Students examine the processes and theory of project management as well as industry case studies, and will utilize project management software in support of their management activities. Guest speakers and field research provide students with access and information from industry and academia. Students are engaged in a semester-long project. Initially, they are required to identify the project scope and team charter for their project; subsequent assignments require them to prepare a business case, work breakdown structure, cost estimate, and final project documentation for their project.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 460, CSC 460, MGT 460, NSG 611

MIS 712. Financial Telecommunications and Cybersecurity. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of the concepts and principles of telecommunications systems and networks, blending technical with managerial topics. Students will focus on the challenges inherent in securing financial telecommunications networks, particularly the challenges of insider threats. Students will local area networks, wide area networks, wireless networks, value-added networks, as well as other networks. Students will complete a series of network installation and test projects, and will analyze network design cases throughout the semester. Guest speakers from industry and case studies from on-going research will provide a real-world contect for the topics discussed in class. Students may sit for network certification following completion of the course.

Prerequisites: MIS 201, or permission of the instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: FIN 478, MIS 478

MIS 715. Mobile Applications & Business Strategies. 3 Credit Hours.

The course explores the important challenges and needs of today's organizations to go mobile to connect with their stakeholders. Students will learn the technical, managerial and marketing aspects of mobile applications. Technically, they will learn the development process and technical infrastructure of mobile applications. Mangerially, students will learn how to develop business strategies to exploit mobile applications for the advancing and repositioning of organizations. For marketing, students will learn to market the newly developed mobile applications and at the same time to use mobile applications to market and promote the organizations and their products or services.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 445, MKT 445, MKT 715

MIS 716. Business Intelligence. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to Business Intelligence, including the processes, methodologies, infrastructure, and current practices used to transform business data into useful information and support business decision-making. Business Intelligence requires foundation knowledge in data storage and retrieval, thus this course will review logical data models for both database management systems and data warehouses. Students will learn to extract and manipulate data from these systems and assess security-related issues. Data mining, visualization, and statisical analysis along with reporting options such as management dashboards and balanced scorecards will be covered. Technologies utilized in the course included SAP Business Warehouse, SAP Business Objects, Crystal Reports, and RapidMiner.

Prerequisite: MIS 201 or permission of the instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 415, MKT 415

MIS 717. Managing the Technological Enterprise. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the requirements, management and performance of enterprises engaged in the use of technology. Requirements determination, analysis, design and cost management activities for technological enterprises are covered; a focus on the management of life cycle costs is emphasized. The management of third party organizations, outsourcing and project management activities are also covered. The legal, environmental and ethical issues associated with the management and performance of technological enterprises are important components of this course. Guest speakers and case studies from local, national and international technological enterprises, agencies and regulatory organizations are employed in this course.

Prerequisites: MIS 201 or MIS 501 or permission of instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 455

MIS 740. Data Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will provide you the knowledge and techniques to approach phenomena analytically. Specially, you will learn the role and process of the data science lifecycle in understanding and gaining insight about phenomena, including how to ask the appropriate questions, identify the appropriate data and information needed, use the appropriate tools to analyze a large volume of data, evaluate the findings effectively with parameters, find the appropriate answers, and present the answers and compellingly. In the business context such knowledge can enable organizations to make quality decisions and develop important business strategies that can enhance organizational performance and that can contribute to significant financial gains. You will proficiently acquire such knowledge and techniques through class discussion, lectures, readings, as well as hand-on exercises. Prerequisite(s): STA 501.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 340

MIS 785. Developing Decision Support Applications With Visual Basic. 3 Credit Hours.

This class covers the basics of structured programming using Visual Basic to develop decision support systems or management science applications. The theory and practice of structured programming, logic, systems development are covered in a series of iterative hands-on assignments, which are designed based on practical decision support systems or management science applications. Students can expect to learn how to create and program advanced Excel applications or other equivalent applications. A term project involving the development and documentation of a Visual basic program is required.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 385, CSC 165

MIS 790. Specl Topics in Mgmt Info Syst. 3 Credit Hours.

Courses in this series offer an in-depth exploration of specific issues within the field of management information systems, as well as topics of current interest to students and instructors.

MIS 795. Special Topics in Information Systems Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

Information systems, composed of technology, people, information, systems, organizations, policies, and society, contain many complex and interdependent elements. The large-scale systems within which many information systems reside, including organizations, technology systems, communitites, nations, and even human biological systems, can be similarly complex with interdependent elements. Information systems researchers study technology, people, information, organizations and systems in order to understand information systems, and the interactions between and the impacts of those elements and information systems, on individuals, groups, organizations, and other systems.

Prerequisite: MIS 501; or permission of instructor.

MIS 796. Information Systems Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours.

Participation in a real-world learning experience is provided in internship opportunities. The intern reports as required to a faculty member, and both student and faculty member assess the internship as it relates to the student's academic program and desired organizational experiences. Six hours of approved work experience is required to generate one credit.

Prerequisite: permission of the program director.

MIS 799. Master's Thesis Research Project. 1-6 Credit Hours.

This course provides an opportunity for graduate students to conduct independent research under the direction of a faculty member. Since the study of Information Systems is interdisciplinary, research linking business, technology and social and organizational science in explorations of how systems that convey information work can be studied in a students masters thesis--whether those systems are human, technological, natural, economic, social or other. Research in Information Systems thus explores technical and business topics, along with ethical questions that arise in business applications of technology in organizations.