Master of Business Administration

The Le Moyne College Master of Business Administration (MBA) program is distinctive because of its emphasis on developing decision-making managers for an increasingly complex world, who combine the art and science of leadership in a global perspective. Today’s manager must be able to analyze everything from balance sheets to socio-cultural diversity. But analysis is hardly enough. Today’s manager must be able to coach, teach, negotiate and communicate. He or she must think through a plan of action, then implement it. Le Moyne’s Jesuit tradition stresses ethical and value analysis as well as oral and written communication.

The MBA program is self-sufficient in the sense that all of the academic coursework needed is contained in the program. Applicants with little or no prior background in business, without a business or accounting undergraduate degree, or whose skills need updating, will find course work available to meet their needs.

Small classes, meeting once a week in the evening and occasional Saturday offerings, encourage close working relationships among faculty, students and staff. All faculty are doctorally qualified and publish research or consult in their respective fields. As a result, students will participate in state-of-the-art discussions, addressing the management issues of the next decade.

Admission Criteria

Applications for matriculation are reviewed by the MBA Graduate Admission Committee and evaluated for an applicant’s intellectual abilities, needs, leadership qualities and ability to complete the program.

Applicants will be assessed according to the following criteria:

A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher learning. Transcripts should demonstrate the attainment of an overall G.P.A. of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale). Those who do not meet this particular requirement may be admitted on a non-matriculated basis in foundation courses. Two courses may be taken on this basis in consultation with the MBA director.

Relevant work experience as well as examples of professional achievement or other information that might be used to assess personal qualities and ability to complete the program.

Recommendations attesting to the applicant’s intellectual ability, leadership potential and ability to complete the program.

An acceptable undergraduate GPA and a Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) score (or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score converted to a predicted GMAT score) determined by using the following formula: GPA multiplied by 200 plus GMAT score must equal 1050 or greater. GMAT and GRE scores must be taken within the last 5 years.

The GMAT/GRE requirement will be waived for applicants who:

  • Hold a terminal degree such as a JD, MD, DO, PhD, EdD, PharmD or DDS
  • Hold a graduate degree (master's-level) and/or professional certification (i.e. CPA, CFA, CMA CIA or CFP) and a minimum 3.25 cumulative GPA.
  • Achieved a satisfactory score on a graduate entrance exam other than the GMAT or GRE (such as the MCAT or LSAT) within the last five years.
  • Acheived greater than or equal to a 3.30 cumulative GPA in their undergraduate degree.

Application Requirements

  • Completed application
  • Official GMAT or GRE scores
  • Official transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate institutions attended
  • Two letters of recommendation from professionals or academic advisors who can attest to your ability to be successful in a graduate program
  • Professional résumé
  • Advising appointment with the MBA program director

Academic Awards

The following award is presented to graduate students at the Honors Convocation: The Michael D. Madden Graduate Award for Excellence in Strategic Management. It is awarded to a graduate student team for the most outstanding project in strategic management.

Academic Criteria

Each student must complete a minimum of 30 of the 51 credits in the Le Moyne MBA Program, as approved by the MBA director. All students must take BUS 750 Strategic Management, the capstone course. Successful completion of the Le Moyne MBA program requires a minimum cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0 and a minimum residency of 30 credit hours.

Transfer Credit/Waiver Policy

Waivers of courses or the acceptance of transfer credit will be considered based on the following:

Waivers of foundation courses could be granted to those who have completed the equivalent academic requirements in their undergraduate program. Typically, two undergraduate courses, in the appropriate area and at the appropriate level, completed in recent years with a grade of B or better, could be used to waive an MBA foundation course. Because of the highly diverse nature of undergraduate education, all waivers will be considered by the MBA director on a case-by-case basis.

For most courses, equivalent content level graduate courses from AACSB accredited institutions with a grade of B or better may be accepted as transfer credit. Transfer courses must be approved by the MBA director. Transfer credits are not included in the quality point index.

Term Limit for Completion

When an MBA candidate becomes matriculated, he/she has a total of six years to complete program requirements. If, however, an MBA candidate is within three courses of completing the degree by the end of the six-year period, he/she may petition the MBA director to request an extension not to exceed one calendar year or three consecutive semesters.

Probation and Termination

Matriculated MBA students with a cumulative G.P.A. of less than 3.0 are immediately placed on academic probation. The student will be notified and must meet with the director before continuing with further study. Until the student meets with the director, a hold will be placed on his or her registration. The director, in consultation with the student, will specify a time and course schedule after which the student is expected to have raised his or her cumulative G.P.A. to the required 3.0 level. If the student does not meet the requirement by the specified time schedule, he or she will not be allowed to continue with the MBA program.

Withdrawal or Leave of Absence

MBA students who anticipate not being able to attend the MBA Program during two consecutive semesters should request a formal leave of absence in writing from the director in order to maintain matriculated status. Forms are located in the forms library link on the MBA website.

Accounting (ACT)

ACT 501. Intro Fin & Managerial Act. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of objectives, concepts and principles of financial statements prepared for users external and internal to the business organization. Topics include financial statement analysis, measurement of income and capital, accounting for fixed assets, measuring and accounting for corporate debt and other selected financial reporting issues, planning and control of operations.

ACT 530. Government Contract Accounting. 3 Credit Hours.

Basic cost accounting concepts and the cost accumulation process are presented. This course provides guidance on accounting for, recovering and monitoring costs at each step of government contract performance, from bidding to closeout. An understanding of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), the Truth in Negotiations Act (TINA), the treatment of unallowable costs and the Defense Contact Audit Agency (DCAA) auditing standards will be provided. Current topics on special and emerging issues, including new TINA and FAR requirements; rules applicable to nonprofit associations, universities, hospitals, and state and local governments; incurred cost-electric (ICE);cost accounting issues in privatization projects and commercial item acquisitions; and the impact of procurement reform and streamlining will also be covered.

Prerequisite: Intro Accounting.

Cross-listed Courses: ACT 430, BUS 430, BUS 530

ACT 536. Introduction to Government Contracting Law, Compliance, Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the legal and regulatory framework for doing business with the federal government. The course of study will center on the requirements of the Federal Acquisition Regulations, and will include a study of several related statutes, as well as the regulatory compliance and business ethics requirements of doing business with the federal government. Guest speakers and case studies provide students with access and information from industry and academia.

Prerequisites: ACT 201 or ACT 203 or LAW 200 or permission of the instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: ACT 436, BUS 436, LAW 436, BUS 536, LAW 536

ACT 537. Capstone Course: Cases in Government Contracting Law, Compliance, and Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is the capstone course in the Government Systems Contracting certificate at Le Moyne. It requires the student to synthesize knowledge about the legal and regulatory framework for doing business with the federal government through a series of case studies of law, compliance and ethics. Course material focuses on cases derived from requirements of the Federal Acquisition Regulations, and related statutes. Guest speakers from industry and government will discuss regulatory compliance and business ethics requirements topics with students during class.

Prerequisites: BUS 536, ACT 536, LAW 536 or permission of instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: ACT 437, BUS 437, LAW 437, BUS 537, LAW 537

ACT 550. Accounting Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine the design, control and operation of accounting information systems with a strong emphasis on integration. The course will present a thorough introduction to basic information systems theory, provide a working knowledge of systems analysis and design techniques, databases and enterprise systems. Understanding and appreciation of accounting information systems is critical to successfully managing, auditing and developing systems to support today's evolving business environment. This course offers a focused look at accounting information systems as part of enterprise resource planning systems, with a focus on SAP and other comparable enterprise systems to demonstrate concepts. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or above in MIS 201/MIS 501, and in either ACT 203 and ACT 204, or in ACT 201 and ACT 202.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 350, ACT 350, MIS 550

ACT 701. Federal Income Taxation. 3 Credit Hours.

An analysis of the federal income tax laws relating to individuals. Income, deductions, credits and special tax computations are studied as they relate to individuals. Income tax returns are prepared with an introduction to tax research methods.

ACT 702. Taxes & Business Strategy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course applies principals of corporate tax law, corporate finance and microeconomics to examin the contests giving rise to tax-planning opportunities which arise in the broader setting of corporate decision making. With an emphasis on economic consequences and explicit and implicit trade-offs between various alternative contracting arrangments, rather than on the minutia of corporate tax law, the primary course focus is on how taxes affect asset prices, equilibrium returns and firm structure both financially and operationally. Topics include basic fundamentals of corporate income taxation and strategy, optimal organizational forms, compensation and retirement planning, multinational tax planning and investing considerations, along with an introduction to corporate formation, mergers and acquisitions.

ACT 704. Strategic Cost Management. 3 Credit Hours.

This course concerns using accounting information for strategic, tactical and operating decisions. It extends the perspective of cost management/analysis from a primary focus on tactical short-run concerns to an emphasis on strategic long-run issues. The linkage between cost management/analysis and strategy is made possible by utilizing three powerful strategic management tools: value chain analysis, strategic positioning analysis, and cost driver analysis. The purpose of Strategic Cost Management (SCM) is to support decision-makers as they develop, communicate, implement, evaluate and modify organizational strategy. This course is designed for MBA students who have completed ACT 303 (Undergraduate), ACT 501 (Graduate), or the equivalent.

ACT 705. Business Valuation. 3 Credit Hours.

Students will use a variety of tools to analyze financial reports into meaningful units for analysis, forecasting and valuation of a complex firm. Provides the knowledge and skills necessary to analyze, interpret, understand, and use financial information to make informed decisions. Students may not earn credit for both ACT 404 and ACT 705.

ACT 721. Taxation of Corporations. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the fundamental concepts and strategy of the federal income taxation of corporations, and how the strategies influence business decisions. While the course focuses on learning and applyng the current tax laws, emphasis is placed on the research skills necessary to determine the current state of the law and special emphasis is placed on integrating tax rules into planning decisions. Prerequisite(s): ACT 701 or equivalent per permission of Chair/Program Director.

ACT 723. Tax Research and Practice. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the methods and techniques of federal tax research. In addition, students will learn the rules and procedures for representing clients before the Internal Revenue Service and tax courts.

Prerequisite: ACT 701 or equivalent per permission of instructor.

ACT 724. Advanced Taxation of Partnerships. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will relate to a lifecycle of a partnership and cover such topics as formation, operations, allocations, distributions, sales, liquidations and retirements. The Internal Revenue Code, Treasury Regulations, Case Law, and IRS Rulings will be used as a foundation for understanding theses topics. Students will be expected to use these resources in conducting tax research and preparing for class. Prerequisite(s): ACT 721 (Taxation of Corporations) or equivalent per permission of Chair/Program Director.

ACT 725. Advanced Estate and Gift Tax. 3 Credit Hours.

In depth exploration of the federal taxation of gratuitious transfers during a taxpayer's lifetime and property transfers at death. A study is made of relevant statutes and regulations.

Prerequisite: ACT 701 or equivalent with instructor permission.

ACT 726. Tax Accounting for Income Taxes. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will focus on the initial elections for new taxpayers such as the selection of an accounting method and period (particularly in cases where the accounting and tax records differ), special elections available to taxpayers, installment reporting, inventory methods, and long-term contract accounting. We will also deal with the ways, effect, procedures as well as the IRS rules for a change of accounting method. From there the course will focus on the accounting/tax treatment accorded current and deferred income tax liabilities and expenses with their reporting requirements. Our discussion will include the reporting of uncertain positions under Fin ASC 740 and the IRS. Prerequisite(s): ACt 701 (Federal Tax Issues and Analysis) or equivalent with permission of Chair/Program Director.

ACT 727. International Taxation. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of tax issues concerning the taxation of international transactions from a United States perspective. Examines the various complex issues in partnership, individual and corporate tax planning, and the tax issues involved with joint ventures.

Prerequisite: ACT 701 or equivalent with permission of Chair/Program Director.

ACT 740. Advanced Taxation Capstone Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

This is a research-based capstone course to the Certification in Taxation. Students will spend a predominant amount of time researching code law, regulations, and case law. The instructor will spend considerable time with students in order to ascertain that students are including appropriate subject and reference material, conducting the fullest possible analysis of the selected tax law/case subject area, and completing the research at a satisfactory progress level. Prerequisite(s): ACT 701, ACT 721 and ACT 723 or equivalents with instructor permission.

ACT 790. Special Topics in Accounting. 3 Credit Hours.

Courses in this series offer an in-depth exploration of specific issues within the field of accounting, as well as topics of current interest to students and instructors.

Business Analytics (ANL)

ANL 601. Supply Chain Management. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides the analytical experience for modeling manufacturing and service systems, and the understanding of how they utilize limited resources to provide goods and services. The course introduces students to different quantitative techniques and decision-making approaches and their applications to operations management problems. The problem-solving approach also involves the use of several personal computer packages containing management science and operations research programs. Topics include forecasting, facility layout, production processes, planning, scheduling, resource allocation, inventory systems, project management, decision analysis and quality control. Recommended prerequisites: STA 501 and MIS 501.

ANL 702. Cases in Business Analytics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with problem-solving skills in the field of quantitative management. The case approach is adopted to introduce complex real life examples to student-teams in a competitive environment. The course also introduces theoretical grounds for some analytical models emphasizing the assumptions and limitations of these models. The assigned cases include applications of regression, networking, linear programming, PERT, queuing theory, decision making under uncertainty and simulation. The students are required to use available computer packages as problem-solving tools and are encouraged to conduct sensitivity (what-if) analysis in their decision making approaches.

Prerequisite: ANL 601.

ANL 790. Special Topics in Business Analytics. 3 Credit Hours.

Courses in this series offer an in-depth exploration of specific issues within the field of operations management, as well as topics of current interest to students and instructors.

Business Administration (BUS)

BUS 501. Business Communications. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with the technical skills and necessary theoretical knowledge of communication arts as applied to specific business situations. Topics include use of presentation formats, appropriate rhetorical constructions, communications theory, technical writing and documentation.

BUS 530. Government Contract Accounting. 3 Credit Hours.

Basic cost accounting concepts and the cost accumulation process are presented. This course provides guidance on accounting for, recovering and monitoring costs at each step of government contract performance, from bidding to closeout. An understanding of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), the Truth in Negotiations Act (TINA), the treatment of unallowable costs and the Defense Contact Audit Agency (DCAA) auditing standards will be provided. Current topics on special and emerging issues, including new TINA and FAR requirements; rules applicable to nonprofit associations, universities, hospitals, and state and local governments; incurred cost-electric (ICE);cost accounting issues in privatization projects and commercial item acquisitions; and the impact of procurement reform and streamlining will also be covered.

Prerequisite: Intro Accounting.

Cross-listed Courses: ACT 430, BUS 430, ACT 530

BUS 536. Introduction to Government Contracting Law, Compliance, Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the legal and regulatory framework for doing business with the federal government. The course of study will center on the requirements of the Federal Acquisition Regulations, and will include a study of several related statutes, as well as the regulatory compliance and business ethics requirements of doing business with the federal government. Guest speakers and case studies provide students with access and information from industry and academia.

Prerequisites: ACT 201 or ACT 203 or LAW 200 or permission of the instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: ACT 436, BUS 436, LAW 436, ACT 536, LAW 536

BUS 537. Capstone Course: Cases in Government Contracting Law, Compliance, and Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is the capstone course in the Government Systems Contracting certificate at Le Moyne. It requires the student to synthesize knowledge about the legal and regulatory framework for doing business with the federal government through a series of case studies of law, compliance and ethics. Course material focuses on cases derived from requirements of the Federal Acquisition Regulations, and related statutes. Guest speakers from industry and government will discuss regulatory compliance and business ethics requirements topics with students during class.

Prerequisites: BUS 536, ACT 536, LAW 536 or permission of instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: ACT 437, BUS 437, LAW 437, ACT 537, LAW 537

BUS 601. Business Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will be conducted in seminar style. It will explore and analyze ethical considerations involved in managerial decision making. Topics to be considered are the ethical dimension in managerial dilemmas in such topics as advertising, working conditions, environmental pollution, work force reduction and supplier relations. The relationship of management to the rule of law will be considered in such topics as business involvement in the formation of law as well as business use of the legal and political process. Managerial response to such personal ethical and legal issues as affirmative action, product safety and sexual harassment will be considered. The ethical and social responsibility of management and employees will be explored in the context of profit motive and the implementation of ethical change in a business setting.

BUS 602. Business Law. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will survey the legal techniques used to control business behavior. The role of courts, legislatures and regulatory agencies, as well as common, statutory and regulatory law, will be viewed both from the historical and the current perspective. Specific topics will include contracts, commercial paper, agency, partnerships, corporations, antitrust and securities.

BUS 603. International Business. 3 Credit Hours.

This course seeks to provide an in-depth understanding of diverse aspects of international business including international politics, culture, economics, finance, technology, marketing, ethical decision-making, strategic planning and management, and human resourse development in a global environment. Decision-making in, and challenges facing multinational enterprises are given special attention.

BUS 750. Strategic Management. 3 Credit Hours.

The content and process of the capstone course have been designed to provide a rigorous, integrative experience of all areas of management in a variety of environments. Through lectures and discussions of articles, students are exposed to seminal theory on a given topic. In addition, topic specific, integrative thinking and communication skills are developed throughout the discussions of the articles and cases. Among others, topics will include competitive strategy and formulation, industry analysis, globalization or management, manufacturing as a competitive strategy, horizontal and vertical integration, computer integrated manufacturing and capacity expansion.

BUS 790. Special Topics in Business. 3 Credit Hours.

Courses in this series (BUS 790-794) offer an in-depth exploration of specific issues within the field of business, as well as topics of current interest to students and instructors.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BUS 795. Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours.

This designates credit for approved experiential programs in consultation with the MBA committee.

BUS 799. Independent Study. 1-6 Credit Hours.

This designates individual study programs approved by the MBA committee.

Economics (ECO)

ECO 501. Economics for Managers. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction of economics for managers. It applies macroeconomic methods to business decision making and current global policy issues as well as microeconomic models to consumer, producer and market behavior. Topics include interest rates, inflation, monetary and fiscal policy, and labor markets, as well as demand and cost analysis, industry performance, and market structure.

Finance (FIN)

FIN 601. Financial Management. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the theory and practice of real and financial asset decision making. Topics include short and long term financial planning, capital budgeting, capital structure, option pricing and hedging financial risk, domestic and global financial markets, financial ethics. Case analysis, group and individual projects and use of commercially available financial software packages provide students with ample opportunities to implement financial decisions. Recommended prerequisites: ACT 501 and STA 501.

FIN 665. Distress Investing. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the needed tools to understand and learn the discipline of distress investing. Distress investing is one of the areas of "Fundamental Finance:. Other areas of "Fundamental Finance" include Value Investing, Control Investing, Credit Analysis, and First and Second Stage Venture Capital Investing. This is a course about business valuation, corporate finance, bankruptcy law and security analysis with an emphasis on analyzing public companies that are in financial distress, from the bottom up. This is in sharp contrast to traditional academic finance, which is heavily top down and assumes there is substantive consolidation between the company and its constituencies (managments, stockholders, bondholders, trade vendors, etc.).

Prerequisites: FIN 301 or FIN 601 or equivalent.

FIN 667. Modern Security Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of the course is to provide the student with the needed knowledge and analytical tools to understand and learn the discipline of modern security analysis. The course will focus on business valuation, advanced corporate finance and security analysis with an emphasis on analyzing public companies from the bottom up (as stand-alone, separate and distinct from shareholders, managements, creditors, regulators). The course is centered on the valuation of businesses and how corporate values are reflected or not reflected in public security prices and why. Secondary topics discussed include elemetns of corporate law, securities law, credit analysis, and financial accounting as related to security analysis.

Prerequisite: FIN 301 or FIN 601 or equivalent.

Cross-listed Courses: FIN 467

FIN 701. Investment Management. 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of investment theory, security analysis and portfolio management with applications to domestic and international markets. Efficient capital markets, development of innovative financial instruments and portfolio hedging topics are emphasized. Cases and projects are required.

Prerequisite: FIN 601.

FIN 790. Special Topics in Finance. 3 Credit Hours.

Courses in this series offer an in-depth exploration of specific issues within the field of finance, as well as topics of current interest to students and instructors.

Human Resource Management (HRM)

HRM 601. Human Resource Management. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the relationship between personnel and labor policies and the practices and the objectives of the organization. Theories developed from the behavioral sciences will be used in analyzing the potential impact of changes in policies or practices. Emphasis will also be placed on evaluating the human resource function in terms of meeting the organizational goals. Topics include staffing, training, compensation, performance evaluation and labor relations.

HRM 701. Current Issues in Human Resources. 3 Credit Hours.

As the Human Resource field evolves, so do the challenges presented by the process of recruitment, selection, retention and release. This hybrid course explores in-depth contemporary human resource philosophies, policies and practices that focus on unique areas of talent management in a variety of organizational settings. The class offers students the opportunity to explore online and in-depth research in quality of work life, second career decisions and mid-life change, incentive systems and talent retention. The impact of healthcare changes on organizations, the effects of the recession on the workforce and current issues such as workplace violence and employee privacy will also be explored.

Prerequisites: MGT 601 and HRM 601, or permission of instructor.

HRM 707. Staffing. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is an investigation into the empirical and theoretical research which allows for a full understanding of the staffing process. The staffing process will be illustrated by using a comprehensive case-based model of both individual choice and organization needs in order to allow the student a grasp of the staffing process.

Prerequisite: HRM 601.

HRM 708. Compensation. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on managing compensation in contemporary organizations. The major objectives are: a) to examine the current state of compensation decision- making, b) to examine the implications of recent theoretical and research developments related to compensation decisions and c) to offer an opportunity to develop competencies in making compensation decisions.

Prerequisite: HRM 601.

HRM 790. Special Topics in Human Resource Management. 3 Credit Hours.

Courses in this series offer an in-depth exploration of specific issues within the field of human resources management, as well as topics of current interest to students and instructors.

Management (MGT)

MGT 601. Org Dynamics: Leadership. 3 Credit Hours.

A study of the individual, interpersonal, group and organizational and environmental factors that interact with the culture of an organization and together determine the quality of life and performance. Readings, cases, experiential exercises and group projects will be used to help students understand the concepts and discover which are personally valid for them.

MGT 703. Leadership and Culture. 3 Credit Hours.

The course studies the variations in management and leadership styles across national settings. Factors such as political and economic systems, technology, history and social forces are examined for their relationship to leadership style. Case studies on leadership are extensively used.

MGT 705. International Business Leadership. 3 Credit Hours.

Given today's extensive and intensive global interaction, a lack of understanding or misunderstanding of why our trading partners (or antagonists) behave as they do makes it difficult to successfully deal with them. A key to such an understanding (or avoidance of misunderstanding) is to obtain a better grasp of their antecedents and of how their business systems evolved. This course seeks to address that need. It traces the history of the business systems of Britain, Germany, Japan, and where relevant, those of emerging nations such as China, India and Mexico. We attempt to place matters in proper perspective and to gain a greater awareness of what our implicit and explicit beliefs are, why we espouse them, often unshakably, and in what light our ideologies, policies and actions might be perceived by the Japanese, Germans, Britons or Chinese.

Prerequisite: MGT 601.

MGT 706. Leadership, Management & Humanities. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine models of leadership drawn from classic works of literature and film. Leadership topics will include charisma, crisis management, cultural diversity, ethics, female leadership, goalsetting, the language of leadership, motivation, servant leadership, strategy, team building and transformation leadership. We will discuss the practical and theoretical foundations for these leadership models by examining cases based on the following literary and film texts: All the King's Men, Antigone, The Bridge Over the River Kwai, Citizen Kane, Gandhi, Glengarry Glen Ross, Glory, Heart of Darkness, Henry V, The Iliad, A Jury of Her Peers, The Major of Casterbridge, Moby Dick, Norma Rae, The Odyssey, Twelve O'Clock High and Twelve Angry Men.

Prerequisite: MGT 501.

MGT 708. Lessons in Leadership. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the primary ideas, values and competencies required for modern corporate and community leadership. This course will also challenge students to use what they have learned in readings and discussions to analyze both themselves and well known leaders.

Prerequisite: MGT 601.

MGT 711. Leading Organizational Change. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will tackle three basic questions: What is an organization? What is change? and How to lead organizational change? We will explore the evolving role of leadership, various metaphoric and systems views of organizations and the values and methods of organizational change and development. Student teams will also design and conduct organizational inquiries.

Prerequisite: MGT 501.

MGT 712. Career Self-Assessment. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will cover a wide range of issues and theories of adult and career development and will involve the students in small group and class discussion as they process an extensive set of self assessment instruments and activities intended to culminate in both short- and long-term career and life plans.

MGT 715. The Emotionally Intelligent Leader : Exploring Emotional and Social Competence in Leaders. 3 Credit Hours.

The concept of Leadership has been examined and dissected since ancient times, in search of a replicable process which could be somehow infused to create great leaders. From classic theories to situational explorations, the power to lead can create a better town, a more successful company, a more equitable world. In the 1990's a new voice joined the chorus of Leadership influence as Daniel Goleman spoke to the ideas of emotional intelligence- the ability to identify, assess and control emotions. This course will explore the writings, papers and presentations of Daniel Goleman in a blended format, inviting students to assess their own strategies as colleagues and leaders have a better understanding of the human side of leadership.

Prerequisite: MGT 601 or permission of instructor.

MGT 721. Chaos in Health Care: Directing the Evolution. 3 Credit Hours.

This introductory course explores the interconnectedness of the Health Care System in America. The class uses a multi approach system to investigate the business and social forces that generate the need for creative and revolutionary approaches to healthcare, exploring the field both within the traditional walls of healthcare institutions; and in the outpatient and home care settings. The class will explore emerging trends which are changing this landscape. Attention will be paid to the new practices in health care insurance, and how it impacts delivery systems.

MGT 722. The Strategic and Creative Leader. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is one of two leadership courses in the certificate program which invite students to explore the practices of exceptional leaders in the Health Care field. The design of the course supports and guides the student's ability to discover, explore and assess issues in their field and to recognize opportunities which will continue to maximize their strengths as health care leaders. Conversations with numerous leaders in the health care community highlight this unique class which will enhance the student's netwwork and introduce a diverse palette of leadership thought and action.

MGT 723. Making Leadership Contagious. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is one of two leadership courses in the certificate program which invite students to explore the practices of exceptional leaders in the Health Care field. The design offers a highly introspective approach to each student's leadership style, capacity and development opportunities. Through a series of leadership instruments, highlighted by the Situational Leadership Assessment, students will take part in a reflective journey of what it means to be a leader in the health care field.

MGT 724. The Process of Health Care: Patient Centered Management. 3 Credit Hours.

This course surveys the unique, systematic directives and outcomes within the process of Health Care delivery. Students will explore focus, alignment, expectations, evaluation and incentives which lead to optimum patient care. Leaders must drive the vision which promises timely access, quality care and patient satisfaction in a turbulent environment.

MGT 725. The Business of Healthcare: Connecting the Dots. 3 Credit Hours.

The concept of healthcare within a business model was foreign until recent decades, when costs of health services came to the forefront for organizations committed to providing the best possible care in the face of diminishing resources. This course seeks to explore ethical principles, sound personal and company values, and socially responsible management practices in the interests of responsible and feasible health care delivery as students build a business model for the health care organization.

MGT 793. Bus of Healthcare: Connecting the Dots. 3 Credit Hours.

Special Topics: The concept of healthcare within a business model was foreign until recent decades, when costs of health services came to the forefront for organizations committed to providing the best possible care in the face of diminishing resources. This course seeks to explore ethical principles, sound personal and company values, and socially responsible management practices in the interests of responsible and feasible health care delivery as students build a business model for the health care organization.

Prerequisites: Bachelor's degree.

Management Information Systems (MIS)

MIS 501. Management Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of management information systems (MIS) and their structure is provided through case analysis. Topics covered include the underlying concept of information, decision-making, management and how organizations affect the design of information systems. The impact of information systems on human behavior, organizations and societies is analyzed. Information resources management models underlie the technical and management focus of the course. Students are expected to complete group and individual projects using commercially available spreadsheet, database and systems analysis software packages.

MIS 525. Introduction to Java Programming Programming. 4 Credit Hours.

This course will introduce you to programming and object oriented programming using Java. General programming topics include program design, testing strategies, and control structures such as conditionals, iteration. Object oriented topics include creating and using classes, inheritance and interfaces. Students will also learn about basic data structures such as arrays and strings. Students will solve programming problems in weekly lab sessions. Graduate students in the course will also be introduced to event-driven programming using a graphical user interface (GUI), recursion, and 2-dimensional arrays.

Cross-listed Courses: CSC 170, MIS 325

MIS 535. Intro to Government Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on introductory government systems concepts, processes and functions, utilizing the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR). Students will examine FAR regulations, processes and nmenclature, utilizing existing and proposed regulations and industry case studies, and appropriate support technology. Guest speakers and field research provide students with access and information from industy and academia.

Prerequisites: MIS 201 or permission of instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: BUS 435, ACT 435, FIN 435, MIS 435

MIS 550. Accounting Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine the design, control and operation of accounting information systems with a strong emphasis on integration. The course will present a thorough introduction to basic information systems theory, provide a working knowledge of systems analysis and design techniques, databases and enterprise systems. Understanding and appreciation of accounting information systems is critical to successfully managing, auditing and developing systems to support today's evolving business environment. This course offers a focused look at accounting information systems as part of enterprise resource planning systems, with a focus on SAP and other comparable enterprise systems to demonstrate concepts. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or above in MIS 201 (or MIS 501), and in either ACT 203 and ACT 204, or in ACT 201 and ACT 202.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 350, ACT 350, ACT 550

MIS 601. Information Strategy and Management. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the management, strategies and performance of enterprises engaged in the use of information for competitive advantage. IT alignment with business goals and enterprise resource planning (ERP) tools, techniques and processes are introduced. Modeling and managing life cycle costs, and the impact on competitive advantage, are covered in the course. The management of third party organizations, vendors, outsourcing, and the legal, ethical and environmental impacts of such activities, are important components of this course. Students will complete and present a semester-long project in enterprise resource planning. Guest speakers and case studies from local, national and international technological enterprises, agencies, and regulatory organizations are employed in this course.

MIS 635. Client Side Web Applicatons Development. 3 Credit Hours.

As more and more businesses and individuals turn to the Web for sharing information and conducting commercial activities, a quality web site can provide competitive advantage and invite users for repetitive visits. The key to a quality and successful web site lies in both the content and usability of the site. To increase understanding of web usability, this course will engage students in an exploration of fundamental concepts in web design and development processes with hands-on exercises. This course explores the factors influencing web site usability throughout the design process, including requirements analysis, conceptual design, mockups and prototypes, production, and web site evaluation. Students will also learn to use client-side scripting techniques to enhance web usability.

Cross-listed Courses: MKT 335, MIS 335

MIS 701. Database Management Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course develops the framework for database systems analysis and design. Course topics focus on database design, data modeling, data integrity, security, database management approaches and techniques and distributed databases. Students are expected to complete a database project using commercially available software packages.

Prerequisite: MIS 501.

MIS 703. Systems Analysis and Design. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides the building blocks for analysis and design of management information systems. The systems development life cycle, information gathering techniques, data and process modeling techniques and management of the systems analysis and design processes are covered. Students apply the concepts introduced using computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools.

Prerequisite: MIS 501.

MIS 704. Communication, Networks,teleconferencing. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the management challenges of communications systems, signals and noise. This course considers the problems and limitations associated with interconnecting computers by communications networks. Topics include protocols, interface design, queuing, multiplexing, coding and network configurations.

Prerequisite: MIS 501.

MIS 706. Electronic Commerce. 3 Credit Hours.

Electronic commerce offers exciting and innovative ways of doing business that can enhance organizational performance and restructure corporations. This course is intended to help students understand the fundamentals of electronic commerce and addresses both technical and operational topics. Technical topics covered include back-end database connectivity and information storage and processing. Operational topics include electronic commerce business models, marketing, transactions, security and legal and ethical issues. Through lectures and project exercises, students are expected to develop new frameworks of thinking and practice, tailored to their professional interests.

Prerequisite: MIS 501.

MIS 707. Risk Mgmt in Large Scale Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the challenges associated with risk management in large-scale systems. It considers the nature of social, organizational and technological risk and discusses the role of risk analytic, risk management and risk communications. It also discusses several analytic approaches to risk management and mitigation and analyzes case studies of risk in several large-scale systems: aerospace, biomedical, global networks, healthcare, transportation and safety-critical domains such as firefighting and oil spill response. Using several strategic models, students discuss the importance of tactical and strategic risk management and employ several of the models in case analyses.

Prerequisite: MIS 501.

MIS 710. Health Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with the knowledge of the design, use, and evaluation issues of health informatics applications. The topics include: (1) health informatics as a discipline; (2) career options for health informatics; (3) major health applications and commercial vendors; (4) strategic information systems planning; and (5) new opportunities and emerging trends.

Cross-listed Courses: NSG 387, NSG 697, MIS 450

MIS 711. Managing Systems Project. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on introductory project management processes, technology and tools, utilizing the Project Management Institute's (PMI) Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) and the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI's) Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) processes and nomenclature. Students examine the processes and theory of project management as well as industry case studies, and will utilize project management software in support of their management activities. Guest speakers and field research provide students with access and information from industry and academia. Students are engaged in a semester-long project. Initially, they are required to identify the project scope and team charter for their project; subsequent assignments require them to prepare a business case, work breakdown structure, cost estimate, and final project documentation for their project.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 460, CSC 460, MGT 460, NSG 611

MIS 712. Financial Telecommunications and Cybersecurity. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of the concepts and principles of telecommunications systems and networks, blending technical with managerial topics. Students will focus on the challenges inherent in securing financial telecommunications networks, particularly the challenges of insider threats. Students will local area networks, wide area networks, wireless networks, value-added networks, as well as other networks. Students will complete a series of network installation and test projects, and will analyze network design cases throughout the semester. Guest speakers from industry and case studies from on-going research will provide a real-world contect for the topics discussed in class. Students may sit for network certification following completion of the course.

Prerequisites: MIS 201, or permission of the instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: FIN 478, MIS 478

MIS 715. Mobile Applications & Business Strategies. 3 Credit Hours.

The course explores the important challenges and needs of today's organizations to go mobile to connect with their stakeholders. Students will learn the technical, managerial and marketing aspects of mobile applications. Technically, they will learn the development process and technical infrastructure of mobile applications. Mangerially, students will learn how to develop business strategies to exploit mobile applications for the advancing and repositioning of organizations. For marketing, students will learn to market the newly developed mobile applications and at the same time to use mobile applications to market and promote the organizations and their products or services.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 445, MKT 445, MKT 715

MIS 716. Business Intelligence. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to Business Intelligence, including the processes, methodologies, infrastructure, and current practices used to transform business data into useful information and support business decision-making. Business Intelligence requires foundation knowledge in data storage and retrieval, thus this course will review logical data models for both database management systems and data warehouses. Students will learn to extract and manipulate data from these systems and assess security-related issues. Data mining, visualization, and statisical analysis along with reporting options such as management dashboards and balanced scorecards will be covered. Technologies utilized in the course included SAP Business Warehouse, SAP Business Objects, Crystal Reports, and RapidMiner.

Prerequisite: MIS 201 or permission of the instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 415, MKT 415

MIS 717. Managing the Technological Enterprise. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the requirements, management and performance of enterprises engaged in the use of technology. Requirements determination, analysis, design and cost management activities for technological enterprises are covered; a focus on the management of life cycle costs is emphasized. The management of third party organizations, outsourcing and project management activities are also covered. The legal, environmental and ethical issues associated with the management and performance of technological enterprises are important components of this course. Guest speakers and case studies from local, national and international technological enterprises, agencies and regulatory organizations are employed in this course.

Prerequisites: MIS 201 or MIS 501 or permission of instructor.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 455

MIS 740. Data Science. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will provide you the knowledge and techniques to approach phenomena analytically. Specially, you will learn the role and process of the data science lifecycle in understanding and gaining insight about phenomena, including how to ask the appropriate questions, identify the appropriate data and information needed, use the appropriate tools to analyze a large volume of data, evaluate the findings effectively with parameters, find the appropriate answers, and present the answers and compellingly. In the business context such knowledge can enable organizations to make quality decisions and develop important business strategies that can enhance organizational performance and that can contribute to significant financial gains. You will proficiently acquire such knowledge and techniques through class discussion, lectures, readings, as well as hand-on exercises. Prerequisite(s): STA 501.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 340

MIS 785. Developing Decision Support Applications With Visual Basic. 3 Credit Hours.

This class covers the basics of structured programming using Visual Basic to develop decision support systems or management science applications. The theory and practice of structured programming, logic, systems development are covered in a series of iterative hands-on assignments, which are designed based on practical decision support systems or management science applications. Students can expect to learn how to create and program advanced Excel applications or other equivalent applications. A term project involving the development and documentation of a Visual basic program is required.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 385, CSC 165

MIS 790. Specl Topics in Mgmt Info Syst. 3 Credit Hours.

Courses in this series offer an in-depth exploration of specific issues within the field of management information systems, as well as topics of current interest to students and instructors.

MIS 795. Special Topics in Information Systems Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

Information systems, composed of technology, people, information, systems, organizations, policies, and society, contain many complex and interdependent elements. The large-scale systems within which many information systems reside, including organizations, technology systems, communitites, nations, and even human biological systems, can be similarly complex with interdependent elements. Information systems researchers study technology, people, information, organizations and systems in order to understand information systems, and the interactions between and the impacts of those elements and information systems, on individuals, groups, organizations, and other systems.

Prerequisite: MIS 501; or permission of instructor.

MIS 796. Information Systems Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours.

Participation in a real-world learning experience is provided in internship opportunities. The intern reports as required to a faculty member, and both student and faculty member assess the internship as it relates to the student's academic program and desired organizational experiences. Six hours of approved work experience is required to generate one credit.

Prerequisite: permission of the program director.

MIS 799. Master's Thesis Research Project. 1-6 Credit Hours.

This course provides an opportunity for graduate students to conduct independent research under the direction of a faculty member. Since the study of Information Systems is interdisciplinary, research linking business, technology and social and organizational science in explorations of how systems that convey information work can be studied in a students masters thesis--whether those systems are human, technological, natural, economic, social or other. Research in Information Systems thus explores technical and business topics, along with ethical questions that arise in business applications of technology in organizations.

Marketing (MKT)

MKT 601. Marketing Management. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces the role of marketing in organizations, including customer analysis and buyer behavior, market segmentation and research, distribution channel and product policy, strategy, pricing and marketing communications. Case studies provide an opportunity for analytical approaches to problems both orally and in writing.

MKT 706. Nonprofit Marketing. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses upon the concept of "social enterprise," an increasingly prominent way of thinking about ventures that both social and commercial entities are undertaking. Students will be introduced to this emerging intersection between the nonprofit sector and the business world.

MKT 715. Mobile Applications & Business Stratgs. 3 Credit Hours.

The course explores the important challenges and needs of today's organizations to go mobile to connect with their stakeholders. Students will learn the technical, managerial and marketing aspects of mobile applications. Technically, they will learn the development process and technical infrastructure of mobile applications. Managerially, students will learn how to develop business strategies to exploit mobile applications for the advancing and repositioning of organizations. For marketing, students will learn to market the newly developed mobile applications and at the same time to use mobile applications to market and promote the organizations and their products or services.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 445, MKT 445, MIS 715

MKT 790. Special Topics in Marketing. 3 Credit Hours.

Courses in this series offer an in-depth exploration of specific issues within the field of marketing, as well as topics of current interest to students and instructors.

Statistics (STA)

STA 501. Quantitative Decision Making. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides the principles of statistical inference. Probability, random variables, univariate distribution theory, hypothesis testing and estimation theory will be the focus of the first part of the course. Additional topics are selected from decision theory, nonparametric methods and linear modeling. Emphasis is placed on the use of statistical software packages to handle practical statistical analyses.