Nursing (NSG)

NSG 315. Health Assessment. 3 Credit Hours.

This course uses a systems perspective to broaden the student's knowledge of physical, cultural, sociological, and nutritional aspects of health assessment of individuals across the life span. A laboratory setting is used to acquire and refine the techniques of physical assessment and critical thinking skills are emphasized in the identification of risk factors and other variables affecting health patterns. A focus is placed on therapeutic communication skills for effective interviewing and history taking, which are essential in the collection of health assessment data. Students are expected to accurately perform a systematic, comprehensive health assessment and a critical analysis of assesssment data. Registration open only to Nursing or with permission of the department Chair.

NSG 315L. Health Assessment Lab. 0 Credit Hour.

NSG 330. Professional Issues and Trends. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the role of the professional nurse from an evolutionary, present, and future perspective. Educational, organizational, philosophical, and practical trends are explored. Identification of the characteristics of a profession and the qualities of a professional nurse enhances the student's insight into the meaning of professionalism in practice. Selected concepts and issues related to practice standards and modalities, taking into account the diversity of the client populations served, are theoretically applied to the care of individuals, families, and groups in a variety of settings. The impact of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches on the socialization and re-socialization of the professional nurse in practice is emphasized. THe development of a written philosophy of nursing is required, which provides each student with the opportunity for personal reflection on the profession and the role of the professional nurse within the dynamic system of health care delivery.

Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Diversity (DIV).

NSG 350. Research in Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

This course, which addresses the principles of scientific inquiry, introduces the student to the development of nursing as a science. An understanding of the major steps of the research process fosters the acquisition of analytical thinking, problem solving, and critical appraisal skills. Students are guided in the assessment and evaluation of both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. The role of the professional nurse as data collector, designer, producer, replicator, and consumer of research is explored. The opportunity to critique selected research studies allows the students to apply knowledge of the research process and to understand how research findings provide the basis for evidenced-based practice. Prerequisite/Corequisite: NSG 330 and MTH 110 or NSG 330 and MTH 111.

NSG 387. Health Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with the knowledge of the design, use, and evaluation issues of health informatics applications. The topics include:(1) health informatics as a discipline; (2) career options for health informatics; (3) major health applications and commercial vendors; (4) strategic information systems planning and project management; and (5) new opportunities and emerging trends. A semester-long group will provide students hands-on experience in planning healthcare information systems; associated ethical and legal concerns, software engineering and human-computer interaction issues, and user acceptance and outcomes evalutation methods will also be discussed.

Cross-listed Courses: NSG 697, MIS 450, MIS 710

NSG 390. Independent Study. 1-6 Credit Hours.

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration, a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and the goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure and number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty memeber, the department chair and the dean of arts and sciences. It will be kept on file in the dean of arts and sciences' office. Pass/fail option.

NSG 401. Holistic Stress Management. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate and graduate students to the field of holistic stress management. Stress will be understood from physiological, psychological, and spiritual dimensions. The impact and role of physical activity, nutrition, sleep, congnitive coping skills, and relaxation techniques will be examined from the perspective of how they support health and prevent and/or alleviate the physical symptoms of stress when caring for self, patients, families, or others. Students will learn comprehensive principles, theories, and skills needed to effectively manage personal stress, and to understand the psychosomatic (mind-body-spirit) relationship. The course will support students to employ a holistic approach to stress management in both their personal and professional lives.

NSG 410. Management and Leadership in Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses the professional role of the nurse as manager and leader within the health care environment. The multiple and complex factors involved in the management and leadership function of the professional nurse are examined, including employment practices, staffing, institutional development, budgetary and health care financing concerns, accountability, information management, consumer satisfaction, and employee and employer relations. Selected management and leadership models, concepts, and theories are explored as a basis for planning, organizing, directing, changing, and controlling dynamic human resources for the provision of quality nursing care in a variety of health care settings. Particular emphasis is placed on ethical decision making and on the development of communication and interaction skills essential to effectively working with groups and organizations. A clinical practicum experience provides the student with the opportunity to observe the role of the nurse as manager and leader and to apply the principles of management and leadership within a practice setting. Prerequisite or corequisite: NSG 330.

NSG 411. Nursing and Health Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses the impact of health policy, health care financing and economics, and legislative and regulatory authority on nursing practice and the health care delivery system. Societal and professional issues influencing nursing practice will be examined. The role of the nurse as an active participant in developing and influencing policy, legislative and regulatory actions will be addressed.

Prerequisite: NSG 330.

NSG 421. Global Perspective on Family Health. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on factors that influence the health of populations and families globally. The framework for investigation of families is systems theory combined with an interaction and developmental life-cycle theory. Cultural, ethnic, racial, religious, and socioeconomic variables that strongly influence family life are identified and analyzed globally. A cross-cultural framwork is used to compare the health status of populations & families that affect their health in social subgroups. Global health promotion goes far beyond the efforts of individual countries and the humanitarian attempts of more affluent nations to protect and promote health in developing countires, populations and families and can only be solved through global cooperation.

Prerequisites: NSG 330 and NSG 350.

NSG 440. Community Health. 4 Credit Hours.

This capstone course focuses on the theory and practice of community health nursing using an open systems framework. It blends the components of public health science, which incorporates the principles of epidemiology, and the art and science of nursing. The emphasis is on the community as client for a population-focused practice of nursing. Students conduct assessments of individuals, families, and groups to identify health needs and commonly encountered health problems within the population. Research-based findings are critically examined and applied in the process of planning, implementing, and evaluating nursing interventions at the primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention. Using the many community-based resources available for nursing practice, students are provided the opportunity for clinical experience in a wide variety of settings to advance their skills in delivery of care to populations and in communicating and collaborating with clients and health care team members for the overall improvement in the health of the community. Pre/co-requisite: BSC 435 Fulfills Core requirement(s): DIV.

Prerequisite: NSG 330.

NSG 461. Principles of Teaching and Learning. 3 Credit Hours.

The focus of this course is on role development of the nurse as educator and is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to educate various audiences in a variety of settings with efficiency and effectiveness. It is a comprehensive coverage, both in scope and depth, of the essential components of the education process and the principles of teaching and learning. Designed to increase students' proficiency in educating others, it takes into consideration the needs and characteristics of the learner as well as how to choose and use the most appropriate instructional techniques and strategies by which to optimize learning. Although the theories and concepts addressed in this course can be applied to any audience of learners, the focus is on patient education. An understanding of the basics of teaching and learning allows the educator to function as a "guide by the side" and as a "facilitator" of learning, rather than merely as a "giver of information". This approach enables clients to act as responsible partners in their own health care. Emphasis is placed on preparing students to assess, teach, and evaluate learners at all stages of development based on their learning needs, learning styles, and readiness to learn. Students conduct critical analysis of education materials, apply research findings to patient education, and consider the legal, ethical, economic, and political aspects of health care delivery on patient education. Prerequisite/corequisite: NSG 330.

Cross-listed Courses: NSG 561

NSG 475. Transition to Advanced Nursing Practice. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is required of nurses who hold a BA or BS degree in a field other than nursing for progression to the MS in nursing program of study. It is designed to include undergraduate nursing content foundational to graduate level course work. The course includes theories, concepts, and principles related to professional issues and trends, health promotion and protection management and leadership, family health, and community health. Students are expected to gain knowledge, through course discussions, presentations, and other approaches, that is essential for success at an advanced level of educational preparation.

Prerequisite: RNs with BA or BS degree in a non-nursing field.

NSG 501. Holistic Stress Management. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate and graduate students to the field of holistic stress management. Stress will be understood from phsiological, psychological, and spiritual dimensions. The impact and role of physical activity, nutrition, sleep, cognitive coping skills, and relaxation techniques will be examined from the perspective of how they support health and prevent and/or alleviate the physical symptoms of stress when caring for self, patients, families, or others. Students will learn comprehensive principles, theories, and skills needed to effectively manage personal stress, and to understand the psychosomatic(mind-body-spirit) relationship. The course will support students to employ a holistic approach to stress management in both their personal and professional lives.

NSG 531. Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to prepare graduate nurses with higher level knowledge and skills in assessment, diagnostic, reasoning, and management of client problems within a society area of clinical practice. This course is a comprehensive coverage of advanced physiological mechanisms and specific pathologies affecting all of the major organ systems of the human body and advanced health assessment skills with an emphasis on concepts of health promotion, risk management, and disease prevention. The focus is on causality of alternations in human physiological functions in the adult population. Strong emphasis is placed on developing sound clinical decision-making abilities based on an understanding advanced pathophysiology. The concepts of normal physiology and pathological phenomena as a result of altered states of health are contrasted. The human physiological responses to various diseases and disorders are examined in detail from the micro (cellular) and macro (organ) level. Diagnostic tests, laboratory values, and treatment methods pertinent to identifying and managing these alterations in health are discussed. Course assignments are laboratory practice activities enhance the student's history taking, physical assessment, and critical thinking skills essential for planning, delivering, and evaluating health care.

NSG 535. Epidemiology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will serve as an introduction to epidemiology as a basic science for public health and clinical medicine. Epidemiological principles and methods are presented with emphasis on the health status and health needs of a population, on levels of prevention, on susceptibility, communicability, and modes of transmission, and on promotion of health using various strategies. Statistical measures are applied to describe the incidence and prevalence of disease, fertility rates, morbidity and mortality rates, heatlh beliefs and behaviors, socioeconomic, ethnic and racial disparities, causality of disease and disability, and risk factors for the purpose of evidence-based decision making in public health. (Note: This course is not open to students who have taken BSC 435 as undergraduates at Le Moyne College.).

NSG 545. Psych of Grief: Current Under & Interven. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the experience of individuals and families in the face of death and loss. The course will focus on the nature and causes of grief as well as strategies for effective counseling interventions. There will be an emphasis on loss due to death however, other types of psychosocial and physical losses will also be considered. Accordingly, we will explore a variety of factors that facilitate or impede the grief process. The course will initially trace the development of dominant models of grief and their historical and theoretical underpinnings. Considerable emphasis will be on examining the grief process as it is played out in the context of family. The family is seen as an interactive system, with a complex mix of actions, perceptions and expectations that influences the experience of grief among family members. This course will also consider a postmodern view of bereavement as a complex phenomenon embedded in a unique context involving social, cultural, philosophical and psychological factors. The second half of the course will have a distinct practitioner emphasis by connecting theoretical understandings to practicial applications and interventions.

Cross-listed Courses: PSY 445

NSG 561. Principles of Teaching and Learning. 3 Credit Hours.

The focus of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to educate various audiences in a variety of settings with efficiency and effectiveness. It is a comprehensive coverage, both in scope and depth, of the essential components of the education process and the principles of teaching and learning. Designed to increase students' proficiency in educating others, it takes into consideration the needs and characteristics of the learner as well as how to choose and use the most appropriate instructional techniques and strategies by which to optimize learning. The theories and concepts addressed in this course can be applied to any audience of learners, whether they are patients and their families, staff nurses or student nurses. An understanding of the basics of teaching and learning allows the educator to function in the role as a "guide by the side" and as a "facilitator" of learning, rather than merely as a "giver of information". This approach enables the audience of learners to act as responsible partners in the teaching/learning process. Emphasis is placed on preparing students to assess, teach, and evaluate learners of all stages of development based on their learning needs, learning styles, and readiness to learn. Not open to students who have taken NSG 461. If NSG 461 or its equivalent has been completed, a graduate level 3-credit education elective must be substituted to meet master's degree in nursing requirements.

Cross-listed Courses: NSG 461

NSG 566. Contemp Issues in Healthcare Leadership. 3 Credit Hours.

The focus of this course is on the role of the evolving leadership of skills of the master's prepared nurse at various levels of authority and in different practice settings in dealing with a myriad of issues and challenges in a changing and complex world of healthcare delivery. Through a review of leadership paradigms, organizational structure, and current healthcare regulations, students have the opportunity to explore the responsibility and accountability of the master's prepared nurse to internal and external stakeholders. Interprofessional collaboration, development of leadership functions, the influence of technology resources, adherence to ethical and legal standards, advocacy for change or maintaining tradition, and the influence of policy decisions at all levels are considered. Also discussed are issues related to quality improvement, negotiating conflict, personnel and fiscal management, and shared governance models. Skills essential to leadership include communication, collaboration, negotiation, delegation, and coordination.

NSG 590. Independent Study. 1-6 Credit Hours.

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and the goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure, and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair, and the Dean. It will be kept on file in the office of the Dean.

NSG 591. Independent Study. 1-6 Credit Hours.

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and the goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure, and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair, and the Dean. It will be kept on file in the office of the Dean.

NSG 592. Independent Study. 1-6 Credit Hours.

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and the goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure, and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair, and the Dean. It will be kept on file in the office of the Dean.

NSG 593. Independent Study. 1-6 Credit Hours.

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and the goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure, and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair, and the Dean. It will be kept on file in the office of the Dean.

NSG 594. Independent Study. 1-6 Credit Hours.

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and the goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure, and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair, and the Dean. It will be kept on file in the office of the Dean.

NSG 595. Independent Study. 1-6 Credit Hours.

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and the goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure, and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair, and the Dean. It will be kept on file in the office of the Dean.

NSG 596. Independent Study. 1-6 Credit Hours.

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and the goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure, and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair, and the Dean. It will be kept on file in the office of the Dean.

NSG 597. Independent Study. 1-6 Credit Hours.

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and the goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure, and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair, and the Dean. It will be kept on file in the office of the Dean.

NSG 598. Independent Study. 1-6 Credit Hours.

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and the goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure, and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair, and the Dean. It will be kept on file in the office of the Dean.

NSG 599. Independent Study. 1-6 Credit Hours.

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and the goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure, and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair, and the Dean. It will be kept on file in the office of the Dean.

NSG 609. Clinical Teaching in Nursing Education. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will assist nurse educators to develop skills to teach in the unique environment of the clinical and learning laboratory setting. The student will apply theory of teaching and learning to assess the needs and learning style of students in clinical and learning laboratory settings and design meaningful experiences to meet course and clinical objectives. The course will focus the student on making appropriate assignments, designing pre and post conferences, and evaluating student performance. Special situations including selection of preceptors, working with a culturally diverse student and patient population, and managing agency staff expectations will be explored. Legal, ethical and human resource issues will be discussed.

NSG 611. Managing Systems Project. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on introductory project management processes, technology and tools, utilizing the Project Management Institute's (PMI) Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) and the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI's) Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) processes and nomenclature. Students examine the processes and theory of project management as well as industry case studies, and will utilize project management software in support of their management activities. Guest speakers and field research provide students with access and information from industry and academia. Students are engaged in a semester-long project. Initially, they are required to identify the project scope and team charter for their project; subsequent assignments require them to prepare a business case, work breakdown structure, cost estimate, and final project documentation for their project.

Cross-listed Courses: MIS 460, CSC 460, MGT 460, MIS 711

NSG 612. Health Issues in an Aging Society. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the health and wellness issues encountered by a growing numbers of Americans entering late-life years. Healthy aging as well as common illnesses faced by this population will be explored from physiological, psychological, economic, and spiritual perspectives, including emphasis on end-of-life preparation and care. Individualization of care planning based on cultural norms,ethnicity, and moral concerns of the client and family will be incorporated. Discussion of the capacity of the health care system, in particulat the professional knowledge and skills of nurses, to meet the needs of this growing segment of society will be discussed. Also, focus will be placed on policy to support productive and healthy aging, choices in end-of-life care, and the role of nurses and nursing in advancing these goals.

NSG 613. Gross Anatomy. 3 Credit Hours.

Based upon a comprehensive series of regional anatomical dissections, students learn to relate the structure and function of organs and organ systems to their understanding of a wide variety chronic diseases, surgical procedures, and traumatic injuries. The relevance of the distribution and function of blood vessels, lymphatics and nerves to the composition, components and specific roles of the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, reproductive and musculoskeletal systems will be emphasized with respect to common clinical cases and accompanying complications. The laboratory experiences will be supplemented by short didactic summaries of the anatomy related to the dissection and to its clinical application. Only open to FNP students.

NSG 615. Advanced Research. 3 Credit Hours.

This course reviews the research process and focuses on analyzing and evaluating research at the advanced level of nursing practice. Principles of scientific inquiry, including identification of nursing and multidisiplinary theorectical and conceptual frameworks, are used to delineate research questions and uncover evidence for the continuous improvement of nursing practice. Expected competencies include the identification, analysis, and synthesis of research findings related to clinical practice and health care outcomes. Emphasis is on the translation of research to support and inform practice inovations. A basis understanding by the student of the research process, terminology, and statistics is assumed. Prerequisite of undergraduate research course and basic statistics course.

NSG 616. Research Application. 2 Credit Hours.

The exploration and application of research and evidence-based practice (EBP) for advanced practice nursing is the focus of this course. Students will identify practice problems and determine the best way to address those problems after conducting an in-depth search of the evidence-based literature, and after appraising and synthesizing those research findings. Methods for performing a comprehensive literature search and analyzing multiple sources for practice guidelines are emphasized. EBP implementation models will be used by students to explore practice questions and present change. Students will acquire the skill set necessary to identify a practice problem, search for available literature, determine an appropriate practice change, implement that change, and monitor for outcomes with the goal of improving quality in the healthcare environment.

Prerequisite: NSG 612.

NSG 625. Health Care Delivery Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on formal and informal heath care systems within American communities by addressing their historical development, the major forces shaping their present status, and emerging directions of these systems. Throughout the course, the implications for the roles and actions of nurses within health care organizations are explored with respect to planning, policy formulation, financing, and evolving methods of delivering services to clients. Within a rapidly changing health care environment, it is imperative that students understand the actual and potential role of nursing at the local, state, and national levels from the perspective of geographic influences, socio-cultural demands, and environmental stressors impacting on communities and on the available health care systems. Current health care reform issues, concepts and models of health care delivery, directions for change, and methods affecting organizational change on individuals, groups, as well as the nursing profession will be examined and discussed. The purpose of this course is to prepare nurses as leaders in managing various resources for the delivery of quality, cost-effective care.

NSG 626. Systems Thinking for Quality Care. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive understanding patient safety and its relationship to quality improvement concepts. The course explores principles of creating and leading a health care team to deliver highly reliable care focused on patient safety. Students will be provided with an awareness of how the elements of quality management, risk management, as well as data management and general leadership skills integrate together to produce an effective and efficient system to monitor and improve care. A particular emphasis is placed on leadership characteristics essential to creating and sustaining a culture of safety within the health care organization.

NSG 635. Curriculum and Program Development. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this role course is to further develop the knowledge and skills of the nurse as educator. Although the emphasis is on preparing faculty for an academic role, the principles are applicable for nurse educators in staff development, in-service, and continuing education. Thus, the competencies and responsibilities of the educatior in a variety of settings are explored. Ethical, legal, political, social, economic, and professional standards issues are examined as they impact on the education process and influence curriculum and program development. Students are given the opportunity to design, apply, and critique creative teaching and learning strategies as well as to develop outcome criteria as measure to evaluate the success of educational programs and curriculum plans. As a culminating aspect of this course, students examine both the entrepreneurial roles of the nurse educator and how to negotiate an educator position through the use of marketing and interviewing techniques. Seminar and other adult learning approaches are used to foster critical thinking and active participation.

Prerequisite: NSG 461 or NSG 561.

NSG 636. Palliative Care Concepts. 3 Credit Hours.

The focus of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to provide high quality, specialist-level palliative care to patients and families as they experience life limiting illness. The students will gain and understanding of the history and pracitce of palliative care in the United States and other world countries. This course will address advanced communication skills critical in end of life care. Symptom management including physical, psychological, social and spiritual distress will be examined, and strategies to manage these issues will be assessed. An understanding of the role of the advanced practice nurse in palliative care will provide students with the abilty to function as a critical member of the interdisciplinary team. In addition students will conduct an analysis of policy factors relevant to palliative care and its future directions.

NSG 637. Ethical Leadership in Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

The practice of leadership is not confined to those in positions of authority but is required of every member of the profession. Leadership qualities and skils are essential requirements for expert practice in all nursing settings. This class is designed to create an atmosphere of automony, personal responsibility, open-mindedness and continuous learning. Emphasis is placed on the values of caring for the whole person, health care equity, and decision-making in moral and ethical issues. This course is designed to offer both theoretical foundations of leadership and application of practical skills for nursing leaders.

NSG 640. Physiological Changes in Aging. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will focus on the human aging process from a physiological perspective with emphasis on the changes that result in environmental modifications to keep the older adult safe, healthy and productive. Major theories of aging will be explored in relation to common health problems faced by the older adult. Particular emphasis will be placed on concepts of pharmacology and the issues of medications and drug use in the older adult. Special pharmacological problems created by the aging process will able be discussed. Students will use the nursing process to develop plans of care to promote healthy behaviors in the older adult and educate the client, family, and significant others on environmental and lifestyle modifications that may assist the older adult to remain independent and healthy.

NSG 650. Educational Assessment & Evaluation. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the role of the nurse educator in assessing and evaluating the learner (nursing students and nursing staff) from the beginning to the completion of an academic program or other type of education endeavor, such as staff development, in-service, and continuing education programs. A major emphasis is on exploring creative assessment and valuation strategies, using various methodologies to determine learner performance in classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings. The assessment and evaluation processes include exploring topics related to recruitment, admission, progression, retention, and graduation of learners. A major emphasis is on test development, which involves techniques for writing and critiquing different types of examination items as well as scoring, grading, and determining the reliability and validity of tests. Students critically examine issues, policies, procedures, and current research data in education by actively participating in seminars, individual or small group project, class presentations, and other adult learning approaches. Through the development of knowledge and skills, students are expected to gain a broad perspective on the role of the nurse as educator.

Prerequisites: NSG 461 or NSG 561.

NSG 651. Instructional Design. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of instructional design, including the principles of learning theory, pedagogy, and instructional strategies. Strategies will encompass classroom, print and media based tools and activities. The course will provide students with the knowledge and skills to evelop courses as well as instructional materials for a variety of setting. Topics instructional design and course outcomes planning, elements of a syllabus, scaffolding and sequencing content as well as strategies for enhancing student engagement and lifelong learning.

NSG 660. Advanced Pathophysiology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course builds on foundational knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and basic pathophysiology obtained through undergraduate coursework. Alterations of various physiological systems that are frequently encountered in primary care are explored from a lifespan perspective. A case study approach is used to analyze risk factors, pathophysiological changes, signs and symptoms of disease processes, and disease outcomes. Current and appropriate screening and diagnostic evaluative methods are also reviewed to enhance critical thinking and assist the student in developing diagnostic reasoning and clinical management skills.

NSG 663. Advanced Pharmacology. 3 Credit Hours.

The mission of the Department of Nursing, consistent with the mission of Le Moyne College, is to educate nurses at the undergraduate and graduate levels to provide the highest quality nursing service and professional leadership. The nursing curricula, integrating liberal arts and sciences and the culture of Catholic and Jesuit tradition at Le Moyne, aim to prepare nurses to serve as practitioners and leaders in a diverse world of health care for the new century. Graduates are prepared as life-long learners who are future oriented; responsive to the challenges of a dynamic healthcare environment; possess well-developed communication, critical thinking, and technical skills; and demonstrate professional, caring, and competent behaviors that reflect the standards and values of nursing.

NSG 665. Advanced Health Assessment I. 3 Credit Hours.

This course, which serves as the foundation for the Advanced Practice Nursing clinical coursework, focuses on the development of comprehensive, advanced health assessment skills, diagnostic reasoning, and management of common problems in the adult population. Course assignments, laboratory practice, and the use of Observed Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) and case studies enhance the students communication and interviewing skills, complex bio-psycho-social assessment, and critical thinking skills essential for planning, delivering, and evaluating health care. Emphasis is placed on the synthesis of assessment data to arrive at differential diagnoses. Students learn to present patient histories and exam findings in a concise and effective manner.

NSG 666. Advanced Health Assessment II. 3 Credit Hours.

This course, the second in a sequence of clinical courses, builds upon concepts introduced in Advanced Health Assessment I. Theoretical and clinical foundations for comprehensive health assessment through the lifespan from birth through senescence are emphasized. The course furthers the development of the advanced practice role as students apply their physical assessment and diagnostic reasoning skills across diverse populations with increasing competence, confidence, and leadership. The focus of the course is on the comprehensive biopsychosocial assessment of populations from pediatrics (infants, school age children, and adolescents), through reproductive health, and geriatrics, as well as the management of commonly encountered problems in these populations. Emphasis is placed on age appropriate assessment techniques, the identification of normal and abnormal findings, the development of differential diagnoses, and the development of management plans that include teaching strategies that focus on prevention and anticipatory guidance. Course assignments, laboratory practice, and the use of Observed Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) and case studies refine the students communication and interviewing skills, comprehensive assessment skills, and critical thinking skills essential for planning, delivering, and evaluating health care of individuals and families. Pre-requisite:NSG 665: Advanced Health Assessment I.

NSG 667. Advanced Practice Nursing Role. 2 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to the history, ethical standards, and development of the various roles of the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN). The professional, organizational, and scope of practice requirements for each role are explored. APN role transition, certification, and professional activities are examined as they relate to the profession of nursing. Select theories and practices from nursing and related disciplines are integrated to provide a foundation for the graduate student to transition into the advanced practice role and to provide comprehensive care to diverse populations.

NSG 671. FNP Clinical I. 1.5 Credit Hours.

This is the first clinical rotation in a progressive sequence of Advanced Practice Nursing clinical courses for the Family Nurse Practitioner student. The course focuses on the practice and refinement of clinical history taking and assessment skills in an adult, primary care population under the supervision and guidance of a clinical preceptor. Students gain proficiency with presenting concise and accurate patient histories and exam findings to their preceptors. Emphasis is placed on early diagnostic reasoning whereby students begin to develop differential diagnoses and formulate the plan of care. Students are required to complete 135 hours of supervised clinical practice in this course. Pre / Co-requisites: NSG 660: Advanced Pathophysiology, NSG 663: Advanced Pharmacology, NSG 665: Advanced Health Assessment I, and NSG 667: Advanced Practice Nursing Role.

NSG 672. FNP Clinical II. 1.5 Credit Hours.

This is the second clinical rotation in a progressive sequence of Advanced Practice Nursing clinical courses for the Family Nurse Practitioner student. The course focuses on the practice and refinement of clinical history taking and assessment skills in a primary care family population under the supervision and guidance of a clinical preceptor. Students perform age-appropriate, comprehensive and focused histories and physical exams in pediatrics, adolescent, and adult reproductive health, and geriatrics. Students continue to gain proficiency with presenting concise and accurate patient histories and exam findings to their preceptors. Additionally, students work independently on diagnostic reasoning skills to develop differential diagnoses and formulate the plan of care for their preceptors review. More emphasis is placed on patient education with a focus on anticipatory guidance and prevention. Students are required to complete 135 hours of supervised clinical practice. Pre-requisites: NSG 671: FNP Clinical I.

NSG 673. FNP Clinical III. 3 Credit Hours.

This is the third clinical rotation in a progressive sequence of Advanced Practice Nursing clinical courses for the Family Nurse Practitioner student. The course, which must be taken simultaneously with NSG 681, focuses the diagnosis and management of common acute and chronic health problems that occur in the family population across the lifespan. Students are expected to gain proficiency with performing histories and physical exams, developing differential diagnoses, and a prescribing a plan of care for each patient. Students present each patient and the management plan to their preceptors for review. Emphasis is placed on professional collaboration and interdisciplinary consultation with other health professionals, teaching patients and families, and using evidence-based practice to prescribe and evaluate therapeutic interventions. Students must complete 220 hours of clinical for this course.Pre-requisite: NSG 672: FNP Clinical II. Co-requisite: NSG 681: Health & Illness Management I.

NSG 674. FNP Clinical IV. 3 Credit Hours.

This is the final clinical rotation in a progressive sequence of Advanced Practice Nursing clinical courses for the Family Nurse Practitioner student. The course, which must be taken simultaneously with NSG 682, continues to focus on the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic health problems in the family population, however more emphasis is placed on the students independent management of increasingly complex patients. Students are expected to be proficient with performing histories and physical exams, developing differential diagnoses, and prescribing a plan of care for each patient. Students present each patient and an independently formed management plan to their preceptors for review. Emphasis is placed on professional collaboration and interdisciplinary consultation with other health professionals, teaching patients and families, accountability and patient advocacy, and using evidence-based practice to prescribe and evaluate therapeutic interventions. Students must complete 220 hours of clinical for this course. Pre-requisite: NSG 673: FNP Clinical III. Co-requisite: NSG 682: Health & Illness Management II.

NSG 680. Care Transitions. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will explore the movement of patients and families/caregivers between health care providers, different levels of care, and healthcare settings during the course of chronic or acute illnesses. Care transitions will provide the learner with insight into the critical role of the registered professional nurse as the coordinator of the healthcare team in the development of a culturally competent, comprehensive patient and family/caregiver-centered complex plan of care. This includes assessing and addressing the level of engagement in self-management and "compliance." Current validated models used to optimize transitions in care and improve client outcomes, such as readmission rates and medication errors, will be introduced along with principles of adult learning, how to identify health literacy and literacy deficits, and how to tailor appropriate education into daily practice.

NSG 681. Health & Illness Management I. 3 Credit Hours.

This course, which must be taken simultaneously with NSG 673, is designed to prepare the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) student with a theoretical and practice foundation for evaluating and managing common disorders across the lifespan using a family-centered approach. Building upon knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology and advanced health assessment, students advance critical thinking skills by synthesizing assessment data to formulate differential diagnoses and management plans. Emphasis is placed on diagnosis and management of commonly occurring acute and chronic health problems from a lifespan perspective. Students practice and refine their assessment and diagnostic skill sets under the supervision of clinical faculty in the lab, and clinical preceptors in the field. Simultaneously, the student continues to develop in the role of the Advanced Practice Nurse through professional collaboration and consultation with other health professionals, teaching patients and families, and by using evidence-based practice to prescribe and evaluate therapeutic interventions. Seminars, clinical topic discussions, tests, case studies, OSCEs, and clinical practicum experiences further refine the students communication, comprehensive assessment, and critical thinking skills essential for planning, delivering, and evaluating health care of individuals and families. Pre-requisite:NSG 666: Advanced Health Assessment II Co-requisite:NSG 673: FNP Clinical III.

NSG 682. Health & Illness Management II. 3 Credit Hours.

This course, which must be taken simultaneously with NSG 674, is a continuation of NSG 681 and is designed to prepare the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) student with a theoretical and practice foundation for evaluating and managing common disorders across the lifespan using a family-centered approach. Building upon knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, advanced health assessment, and concepts learned in NSG 681, students advance critical thinking skills by synthesizing assessment data to independently formulate differential diagnoses and management plans. Students integrate knowledge and practicum experiences in primary, secondary and tertiary preventive care interventions of patients and families. Emphasis is on the care for persons with acute and chronic issues throughout the lifespan. Students experience a variety of care settings as they continue to practice and refine their assessment and diagnostic skill sets under the supervision of clinical faculty in the lab and clinical preceptors in the field. Simultaneously, the student continues to develop in the role of the advanced practice nurse through professional collaboration and consultation with other health professionals, teaching patients and families, accountability to and advocacy for patients and families, and by using evidence-based practice to prescribe and evaluate therapeutic interventions. Seminars, clinical topic discussions, tests, case studies, OSCEs, and clinical practicum experiences further refine the students communication, comprehensive assessment, and critical thinking skills essential for planning, delivering, and evaluating health care of individuals and families. Pre-requisite: NSG 681: Health and Illness Management I. Co-requisite: NSG 674 FNP Clinical IV.

NSG 690. Special Topics in Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

This series of courses provide the opportunity for the study of content specifically related to nursing and health care that is not included in regularly scheduled course offerings. Courses designated as such will explore professional topics and issues of particular interest to students and faculty.

NSG 691. Special Topics in Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

This series of courses provide the opportunity for the study of content specifically related to nursing and health care that is not included in regularly scheduled course offerings. Courses designated as such will explore professional topics and issues of particular interest to students and faculty.

NSG 692. Special Topics in Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

This series of courses provide the opportunity for the study of content specifically related to nursing and health care that is not included in regularly scheduled course offerings. Courses designated as such will explore professional topics and issues of particular interest to students and faculty.

NSG 693. Special Topics in Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

This series of courses provide the opportunity for the study of content specifically related to nursing and health care that is not included in regularly scheduled course offerings. Courses designated as such will explore professional topics and issues of particular interest to students and faculty.

NSG 694. Special Topics in Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

This series of courses provide the opportunity for the study of content specifically related to nursing and health care that is not included in regularly scheduled course offerings. Courses designated as such will explore professional topics and issues of particular interest to students and faculty.

NSG 695. Special Topics in Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

This series of courses provide the opportunity for the study of content specifically related to nursing and health care that is not included in regularly scheduled course offerings. Courses designated as such will explore professional topics and issues of particular interest to students and faculty.

NSG 696. Special Topics in Nursing. 3 Credit Hours.

This series of courses provide the opportunity for the study of content specifically related to nursing and health care that is not included in regularly scheduled course offerings. Courses designated as such will explore professional topics and issues of particular interest to students and faculty.

NSG 697. Health Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with the knowledge of the design, use, and evaluation issues of health informatics applications. The topics include:(1) health informatics as a discipline; (2) career options for health informatics; (3) major health applications and commercial vendors; (4) strategic information systems planning and project management; and (5) new opportunities and emerging trends. A semester-long group will provide students hands-on experience in planning healthcare information systems; associated ethical and legal concerns, software engineering and human-computer interaction issues, and user acceptance and outcomes evalutation methods will also be discussed.

Cross-listed Courses: NSG 387, MIS 450, MIS 710

NSG 701. Teaching Practicum. 3 Credit Hours.

This nurse educator role course provides the student with an in-depth opportunity to explore and apply teaching and learning theories, concepts, and skills previously acquired in the program to an educational setting. Under the guidence of a faculty member and an expert preceptor, the student will actively participate in the development, implementation, and evaluation of teaching/learning activities during a semester-long practicum experience. The student is expected to establish a specific set of objectives to be accomplished, observe a model teacher, create teaching plans and material based on the moste current research data, enagage in teaching audiences of learners on content pertinent to her/his area of clinical specialization, attend curriculum and faculty meetings, develop and analyze examination items, and conduct a self-evaluation of the practicum experience. The student is expected to complete 180 hours of practicum (2 creditis = 10 hours per week for 12 weeks). Students also will attend a total of 15 hours of seminar and individual meetings with the instructor during the semester to discuss and share teaching and learning experiences in their professional role as educators.

Prerequisite: NSG 635 and Prerequisite or Corequistite: NSG 650.

NSG 702. Palliative Care Clinical Pract. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides the student with an in-depth opportunity to explore the role of the principles of palliative care and apply the knowledge and skills of this specialty practice area in a clinical setting of patients with terminal illness. Under the guidance of a faculty member and an expert preceptor, the student will actively participate in the needs of patients and families coping with terminal illness and plan, implement, and evaluate care during a semester-long clinical practicum experience. The student is expected to establish a specific set of objectives to be accomplished, work alongside a nurse expert in the field of palliative care, integrate the most current research data in the development of palliative of care plans, engage in interdisciplinary collaboration to ensure coordinated and comprehensive patient care, and evaluate the achievement of patient and family goals of care. The student is expected to complete 180 hours of practicum (2.5 credits = 15 hours per week (6 hours/credit) for 12 weeks). Students will also attend 12-15 hours of seminar and individual meetings with instructor during the semester to discuss and share teaching/learning experiences in their advanced professional role as providers of care to terminally ill patients and their families.

NSG 703. Administrative Practicum. 3 Credit Hours.

This nurse administrator role course provides the student with an in-depth opportunity to explore and apply management and leadership theories, concepts, and skills previously acquired in the program to a health care setting. Under the guidance of a faculty member and an expert preceptor, the student will actively participate in the development, implementation, and evaluation of administrative activities during a semester-long practicum experience. The student is expected to establish a specific set of objectives to be accomplished, observe a model nursing administrator, attend organizational meetings, explore issues related to human resource management and quality care delivery, select an administrative problem and carry out appropriate approaches to decision making and problem solving, and conduct a self-evaluation of the practicum experience. The student is expected to complete 120 hours of practicum (2 credits = 10 hours per week for 12 weeks). Students will also attend a total of 15 hours of seminar and individual meetings with the instructor during the semester to discuss and share management and leadership experiences in their professional role as administrators.

NSG 704. Gerontology Clinical Practicum. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with an in-depth opportunity to explore the principles of healthy aging and the care of older adults. In a clinical setting, they will have the oppportunity to apply the knowledge and skills about older adults' growth and development, health promotion, disease prevention, and physiological aging. Under the guidance of a faculty member and an expert preceptor, the student will actively participate in the needs assessment of older adult clients and families and plan, implement, and evaluate care during a semester-long clinical practicum experience. The student is expected to establish a specific set of objectives to be accomplished, work alongside a nurse expert in the field of gerontology, integrate the most current research data in the development of plans of care, engage in interdisciplinary collaboration to ensure coordinated and comprehensive patient care, and evaluate the achievement of patient and family goals of care. The student is expected to complete 180 hours of practicum (2.5 credits = 15 hours per week (6 hours/credit) for 12 weeks). Students will also attend 12-15 hours of seminar and individual meetings with instructor during the semester to discuss and share teaching/learning experiences in their advanced professional role as providers of care to older adults.

NSG 706. Scholarly Project Continuation. 0 Credit Hour.

This course is non-credit bearing and is designed for students who are not able to complete NSG 705 within one semester. This course will allow students to remain connected with a faculty advisor and also to continue their access to Le Moyne College resources. NSG 706 may be taken just one times and must be taken in the next available semester. Upon registering for NSG 706, the students will be charged an administrative fee. In the event NSG 706 cannot be completed in one semester, the student will need to re-register for NSG 705 with a new project proposal.

NSG 707. Nursing Informatics Practicum. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides the student with an in-depth opportuntity to explore the role of the nurse in health informatics in the practice setting. The student will apply knowledge of information systems, information processes, and nursing care delivery to assess system utility in meeting the care needs of patients and the information needs of providers and organizations. Under the guidance of a faculty member and an expert preceptor, the student will actively participate in the needs assessment of patients and providers for information, plan for systems changes, and implement and evaluate system applications. The student is expected to establish a specific set of objectives to be accomplished, work alongside a nurse expert in the field of informatics, integrate the most current research data in the development of plans for information process changes and systems, and engage in interdisciplinary collaboration to ensure coordinated and comprehensive patient care. The student is expected to complete 120 hours of practicum (2 credits = 10 hours per week (5 hours/credit) for 12 weeks). Students will also attend 12-15 hours of seminar and individual meetings with instructor during the semester to discuss and share teaching/learning experiences in their advanced professional role in informatics.

NSG 709. Adv. Practice Nursing Capstone. 1 Credit Hour.

This is the culminating seminar for students in the Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) role. It provides the student the opportunity to summarize, evaluate, and integrate their experiences as they transitioned from RN to novice APN. Emphasis is placed on practice issues related to enhancing the APN role in healthcare settings and in the community at large, exploring job negotiation strategies, and examining the role of the clinical preceptor. Requirements for state and national certification and federal reimbursement are reviewed.

NSG 710. Scholarly Project I. 1 Credit Hour.

This pre-capstone course requires the student to demonstrate the ability to synthesize information acquired in the graduate core, the area of concentration, and the specialty practice/functional role courses in developing a scholarly project proposal. Students must choose a topic related to their role and are expected to work under the direct supervision of a faculty member to organize and complete their Scholarly Project proposal, secure Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, if necessary, and establish a realistic timeline for implementation of their Scholarly Project in NSG 711. A seminar format and individual advisement with the faculty sponsor will be the approach used to assist students to accomplish these expectations.

Prerequisites: Practicum course completed in program.

NSG 711. Scholarly Project II. 2 Credit Hours.

This capstone course requires the student to demonstrate the ability to synthesize information acquired in the graduate core, area of concentration, and specialty practice/functional role courses in carrying out this project. The student must have already decided on a topic related to their role as reflected in the draft proposal completed in NSG 710 and now the student must individually design, implement, analyze, and evaluate a new activity or creative approach that reflects an advanced level of knowledge and skills in their area of concentration. Also, the student must demonstrate well-developed abilities in decision making and problem solving as well as a solid understanding of the research process, socio-cultural issues, ethical dilemmas, and organizational systems for health care delivery. The student is expected to work under the direct supervision of a faculty member to organize and complete this written assignment. This project must demonstrate the student's ability to produce a scholarly paper that is relevant to nursing practice and that is of publishable quality. Co-requisites: NSG 701, NSG 702, NSG 703, NSG 704, or NSG 707.

Prerequisites: NSG 710.

NSG 712. Scholarly Project. 1 Credit Hour.

The course is designed to assist the graduating Master's Clinical Nurse Specialist to demonstrate achievement of the program outcomes and to assume the role of an independent CNS. Learning outcomes in each of the program courses are integrated into the Transition to practice culminating project. The culminating experience is designed to integrate knowledge and skills acquired from coursework into an ePortfolio and reflective narrative that together demonstrate mastery of Essential of the Masters in Nursing Education (AACN) as well as the Clinical Nurse Specialist Core Competencies (NACNS). Pass/Fail only.

NSG 713. Complex Problems of Adults and Older Adults. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides opportunities to explore prevention and management of complex health problems of the adult and older adult within acute and chronic settings. Students are prepared to deliver direct care to and consultation in acute and community settings. Students use principles of nursing theory, evidence-based practice, quality improvement and cost-effectiveness to identify opportunities for improvement for individual care and selected populations. Collaboration and communication skills in the direct care settings are emphasized. Prerequisites(s): NSG 660. Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): NSG 663 NSG 665. Correquisite: NSG 714.

NSG 714. CNS Clinical Practicum I. 1 Credit Hour.

The first clinical practicum is designed to be taken as a corequisite to NSG 713. Complex problems of adults and older adults. During this clinical experience students will spend 90 hours at a clinical site working with a masters-prepared clinical nurse specialist to apply theoretical concepts of complex management to the clinical area. The focus of the first clinical is on the direct care and management of adults and older adults, patient education, and identificaion of system needs and barriers. This course is pass/fail only.

Corequisite: NSG 713.

NSG 715. CNS Clinical Practicum I. 1 Credit Hour.

In the second clinical practicum students are expected to take a more independent role in providing direct patient care and care management as well as interprofessional collaboration, clinical education and project development. Students will spend 90 hours in the outpatient, long term care, acute, or critical health care arenas working with the health care team to provide evidence based care and evaluate patient outcomes. A key component to the second clinical experience is the identification of a major clinical project and the development of an evidence based foundation for that project. Prerequisite(s): NSG 714. This course is pass/fail only.

NSG 716. CNS Clinical Practicum III. 2 Credit Hours.

The third clinical practicum offers students the opportunity to work as a nursing expert within the health care team to manage care of patients. In this clinical course, students will take a leadership role with a team to implement the clinical project proposed and developed in Clinical practicum II. This clinical provides experience in interprofessional collaboration, coaching and mentoring nurses, and systems leadership. This clinical also focuses on intergration of technology and for efficiency and accuracy in quality and outcomes management. Prerequisite(s): NSG 715. This course is pass/fail only.

NSG 717. CNS Clinical Practicum IV. 2 Credit Hours.

Clinical Practicum IV is designed to accompany NSG: 718: Transitions of Care. The emphasis of this clinical experience is on the continuum of care, providing safe and effective means and measures of care, and examiniation of the policies and regulations that governsuch transitions. Additionally, the students will complete the Clinical Project evaluation and prepare a professional presentation of the project goals, methods, and outcomes. This course is pass/fail only. Prerequisite(s): NSG 716.

Corequisite: NSG 718.

NSG 718. Transitions of Care. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers the opportunity to explore models for optimizing health of the older adult and to optimize the journey of older adults through transitions in life as well as transition in health and home environments. Students will examine systems of living environments and provision of healthcare from acute care to assisted living, skilled nursing services, home care and hospice care. Students will explore current transition of care models as well as the barriers and resources available to facilitate comfortable life progression for the patient and family. Students will aslo apply standards of care to evaluate health delivery systems and develop quality improvement programs designed to assist in best practice transitions of care. Emphasis is placed on an understanding and appreciation of diverse providers and perspectives on the provision of care. Prerequisite(s): NSG 616 NSG 660 NSG 663 NSG 665. Corequisite(s): NSG 717.